A healthy version of food has entered the market

Kosher has take lots of households by storm

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cred:muslimmatters.org

Is Kosher Food Healthier?

When you go to the supermarket, you’ll see labels that appeal to all kinds of consumers, from the environmentally-conscious (“organic”) to the allergic (“dairy-free”). You’ll also see a label – “kosher” – originally intended to appeal to people who choose to eat that way to honor their religion. The label means the foods have been prepared in accordance with a set of specific, intricate biblical laws that detail not only which foods people of the Jewish faith can eat, but also how the food is prepared and processed.

Apparently, plenty of folks of all religions are gravitating toward the label. According to a report citing data from the market research firm Mintel, “kosher” was the top label claim on new foods and beverages launched in 2014, with 41 percent of such products donning the tag. Why? Likely because consumers seem to believe kosher items are safer, since they are produced under stricter supervision than the basic food supply, which is overseen by government inspection. Food safety, however, has more to do with how a food is handled (cleanliness) and stored (proper cooking and storage temperatures) than a religious practice.

So what is unique about kosher foods, and how can “kosher” on the label benefit you? Here’s what we know:

  • You can be assured that the overseeing and certification of kosher food is done under rigorous conditions and by the use of guidelines that are never abandoned. Unlike government regulations, these are laws that will not change. Once a kosher label is placed on a food, there is no negotiation about certain characteristics of that particular product.
  • If you are lactose intolerant, have an allergy to dairy products or follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, you can be sure that if a product is marked “pareve” or “parve,” it absolutely does not contain any meat, milk or dairy, nor has it come in contact with such products. There is not a chance that there will be a mistake.
  • Kosher foods will not contain some colorants like carmine that are derived from insects, even though such additives may be considered “natural” in other products.
  • Kosher pareve products are permitted to contain eggs, honey and fish. These foods may not correspond with the dietary laws of Hinduism or a vegan diet, so be sure to read the ingredient list carefully.
  • Kosher salt is lower in sodium content than table salt. By comparison, 1 teaspoon of kosher salt contains 1,120 milligrams of sodium, while the same amount of table salt provides about 2,400 milligrams. This is not an invitation to start shaking things up at the table. The only reason kosher salt is lower in sodium is because it has a larger grain. The larger the grain, the more space it takes up, therefore kosher salt has less sodium by volume, not by weight. By weight, all forms of salt contain about the same amount of sodium. (Meat and skin of kosher poultry, however, can have four to six times as much sodium as non-kosher poultry due to the salt that’s used in the process of making them kosher.)

Interestingly, the word “kosher” means “fit.” Although kosher foods are carefully watched over and controlled, that doesn’t mean choosing kosher foods will automatically keep you fit. The “kosher” label tells us nothing about the calorie, sugar, fat or nutritional profile of a food, so try to keep the preservation of health in mind while preserving tradition.

The above article is from US NEWS

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