How much exercise should kids and teenagers engage in?

Latest research finds out how much exercise children and teenagers require

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Photocred: Therunnerdad.com

It’s a question with an answer that researchers are still trying to better understand: How much exercise do kids need on a daily basis?

In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that children and adolescents should get at least an hour of physical activity each day. The United Kingdom’s National Health Service recommends the same.
There are questions too about the types of physical activity kids and teens should do, how to get young people excited about exercise and what research efforts are underway to better understand fitness on a molecular level.

What kids’ exercise should look like

At least three days of a child’s week should include exercises for muscle strengthening, such as gymnastics, climbing or playing on monkey bars, as well as exercises for bone strengthening, such as jumping, jumping rope or running, according to the CDC and the NHS.
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kids bone health: Photocred:media.com

“One of the most important reasons that children should be active is for their bone health, as it is shown that in the adolescent years, 33% to 43% of the total bone mass is acquired,” said Craig Williams, professor of pediatric physiology and director of the Children’s Health and Exercise Research Centre at the University of Exeter in England.

Peak bone mass is achieved in the third decade of life. … Thereafter it declines due to aging, but if we can increase our peak bone mass in childhood and adolescence, studies have shown that a 10% increase in peak bone mineral density is predicted to delay the development of osteoporosis by 13 years,” Williams said.
“The main message is that children and adolescents need to be physically active daily and to take this habit into adulthood,” he said.
Meanwhile, aerobic activity should make up most of your child’s 60 or more minutes of exercise a day — from moderate activity such as brisk walking to vigorous activity such as running — and vigorous aerobic activity should be done at least three days a week, according to the CDC.
If your child has a chronic disease or disability, the CDC also suggests talking with a health care provider to determine the best physical activity routine. Additionally, the best way to encourage more physical activity in your child’s everyday life could depend on age and interests.

Make exercise — and getting off the couch — fun for young kids

“For younger kids, taking them outdoors with friends can be a cheap way to encourage play, especially if it gets them away from more sedentary activities such as computer games,” Williams said.

“Overall, the more activity becomes habit-forming and part of everyday life, then this will become the norm. The value, of course, is that strong evidence demonstrates that, in children and adolescents, higher levels of physical activity are associated with multiple beneficial health outcomes, including cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, bone health, mental health and maintenance of healthy weight status,” he said. “However, children and adolescents are not necessarily thinking of it like this. They are more interested in fun, being with their friends, and if acquiring new skills, all the better.”
Dr. Stephanie Walsh, a pediatrician and medical director of child wellness at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, said she often sees parents planning long walks with their children as a form of exercise — but that might not be the best approach.
“While walking is a great activity, it’s really boring for kids. So if you’re going to ask your kids to go on a walk, think of some fun things to do along the way,” Walsh said.
“Kids like to exercise in bursts of activity, so they’re more likely to run to the next driveway and back to you as you keep walking than they are to want to walk slowly with you,” she said. “You can make your walk have a scavenger hunt. You can do funny obstacle courses, you can do hopping, walking backwards, tell funny jokes as you’re walking, anything like that will help make the activity more fun and keep your kid involved in it.”
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Kids model you: Photocred: momsxyz.com

Walsh added that it can be beneficial for parents to model being active and eating healthy. Some families, however, might live in neighborhoods that are not safe to walk in and that don’t have access to healthy foods — and so maintaining a healthy lifestyle as a family can be a significant challenge.

“One thing I hear a lot from families is just their concern about their kids having safe places to play,” Walsh said. “If you really don’t have a safe neighborhood, there are indoor activities that you can do … play some sort of active games.”
On the other hand, parents of older kids and teens might want to take a different approach to encouraging their children to be physically active.

 The ‘slippery slope’ of getting teens to exercise

Particularly among girls, Walsh said, there is a large dropoff in daily physical activity once they enter adolescence
“I usually try to talk to parents of girls even earlier — late elementary school or mid-elementary school — to start thinking about this, because we see this dropoff, and it’s really important to keep our girls active so that they can stay that way as older teens and adults,” Walsh said.
“So if you’re the parent of a girl, it’s really important to start even before adolescence to help your kid find something they like to do that they can stick with, either a sport or some sort of activity,” she said.
Yet parents might find it difficult to encourage teenage girls to maintain daily physical activity without introducing body image issues.
When talking about exercise, to avoid introducing body image issues, “don’t ever associate it with weight or weight loss,” Walsh said.
“Physical activity has so many other benefits that has nothing to do with weight. So when you’re talking to your kids about that activity, talk to them about all the benefits, better sleep, better concentration, feeling better, being stronger, increased muscle mass, all those things that are really important about it, but don’t focus on weight,” she said.
“Any time you bring up weight, you start to really go down that slippery slope. I think the same thing when it comes to nutrition. We’re really talking about being healthier,” she said.
For instance, several studiesconducted around the world have found evidence for a positive association between physical fitness and a boost in academic performance among youth — a benefit not necessarily related to weight.

 The ‘explosion’ of childhood obesity and physical inactivity

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Children obesity: Photocred: telegraph.co.uk
“We know that physical fitness is associated with improved academic performance. We know that it’s associated with well-being. We know that it’s a social determinant of health. So we want to elevate this,” said Dr. Dan Cooper, a professor of pediatrics and founder of the Pediatric Exercise and Genomics Research Center and director of the Institute for Clinical Translational Science at the University of California, Irvine.
On the other hand, physical activity in children and adults has been shown to reduce the risk of obesity. Obesity, a growing epidemic in the United States and around the world, means a person has too much body fat, and it can increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis and even some cancers.

Physical fitness patterns in children track through adulthood, and if they’re low, they can be an early indicator that the child could develop heart disease and diabetes later in life,” Cooper said.

“The opportunities for children to engage in free play in a natural environment where climbing, jumping, running are all simply a necessary part of growth and development no longer exist in our mostly built, and often child-unfriendly, modern world,” he said. “We are witnessing the explosion of childhood obesity and physical inactivity, each of which can contribute to poor health. We need to focus attention on how best to restore optimal, healthy levels of exercise to growing children and adolescents.”
The percentage of children and teens affected by obesity has more than tripled since the 1970s in the United States, according to the CDC. It’s estimated that nearly one in five children and teens is obese — and obesity is not just an American problem.
In the UK, obesity is estimated to affect around one in every five children aged 10 to 11, and across the WHO African region, the number of overweight or obese children climbed from 4 million to 9 million between 1990 and 2016, according to the World Health Organization.

 Building a ‘molecular map’ of exercise benefits

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Exercise helps produce smart kids: Photcred-miscw.com
Meanwhile, researchers still are investigating the best exercise recommendations for children and teens and how exercise can impact their bodies in various ways.
“What’s most important about the research is that there are so many benefits to exercise that are outside of this idea of weight loss,” Walsh said. “The benefits to exercise really affect every part of your body and your brain, and that’s really the most important piece.”
Cooper, his colleague Shlomit Radom-Aizik and other researchers at the University of California, Irvine have joined 22 other research institutions across the US to study how physical activity can induce changes in the bodies of both children and adults at the molecular level and how these changes can improve the function of different tissues and organs.
The National Institutes of Health awarded the research project, called the Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity Consortium, about $170 million through fiscal year 2022, pending the availability of funds. The consortium launched in 2016.
“We have long understood that exercising is beneficial to our overall health, but don’t fully understand the impact of exercise at the molecular level,” National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins said in a news release when the consortium was created.
“The development of a so-called molecular map of circulating signals produced by physical activity will allow us to discover, at a fundamental level, how physical activity affects our health,” he said. “This knowledge should allow researchers and doctors to develop individually targeted exercise recommendations and better help those who are unable to exercise.”
For instance, scientists have long known that exercise can have different impacts on children than adults.
A small French study published Tuesday in the journal Frontiers in Physiology highlights what has been found in years past, that adolescents — in this study, particularly teen boys — can recover their heart rate and recuperate more quickly than many adults after exercise.
Studies have also shown that children quickly can develop a habit of exercise.
“We have shown in our studies in the Children’s Health and Exercise Research Centre that over two weeks with just six days of training, using repeated cycle sprints of 30 seconds, the aerobic fitness of the youngsters was significantly improved and was well-tolerated,” Williams said.
Yet many questions remain regarding what that and other findings mean for the molecular makeup of children and adults. The recently formed National Institutes of Health consortium hopes to answer them.
“I think there are such interesting things about exercise in kids: the relationship to school performance; the value of school-based physical fitness testing; the role of exercise in the lifespan sense,” Cooper said. “We now have the tools to be able to study this.”
Author’s opinion
It is imperative to find ways to motivate teenagers and kids to exercise as research proves to benefit their health for the years to come. But more than that here at idealhealthylivingtips we recommend that you ensure that also the kids  eat healthily so that the exercises will just be an added bonus. Here are simple exercises that can help you get your kids and teenagers or your teenage brothers/sisters if you do not have kids ye.t
  1. Play hide and seek with them. This not only helps them get an exercise but it will help stimulate the brain.
  2. Get a dog for them and then let them enjoy chasing it and playing wityh the dog small ball games.
  3. Motivate them to go buy you something at a store (make sure the neighborhood is very safe or atleast work with the there)
  4. Encourage them to develop fun and active games ( You will be amazed at the ideas they may come up with

 

To get the full story ( for the article above) click here

Why young male smokers face an increase in stroke occurrences in this age

THE RISE OF YOUNG MALE SMOKERS IS LINKED TO RISE IN STROKE LEVELS

Ideal healthy living tips
Photocred:Blog.frontiersin.org

THURSDAY, April 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Men under 50 who smoke cigarettes are increasing their risk for a stroke, researchers warn.

And the more they smoke, the greater their stroke risk, reported the University of Maryland investigators.

The bottom line: quit. But if you can’t, smoking fewer cigarettes may help reduce your risk, the researchers said.

“We found that men who smoked were 88 percent more likely to have a stroke than men who never smoked,” said lead researcher Janina Markidan, a university medical student.

At the lower end, men who currently smoked fewer than 11 cigarettes daily were 46 percent more likely to have a stroke than those who never smoked, she said.

But heavier smokers — those with a two-pack-a-day or greater habit — were nearly five times more likely to have a stroke than those who never smoked, Markidan said.

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Tabbaco-Photocred: coolvape.ca

These findings are particularly important because ischemic strokes among younger adults are increasing. And tobacco use among young adults is also on the rise, she said.

Markidan’s team’s prior research identified a strong link between smoking and stroke in young women, but less was known about the relationship in younger men, the researchers said in background notes.

Ischemic strokes — the most common kind — occur when blood supply to the brain is blocked. Stroke is the leading preventable cause of disability, according to the American Stroke Association. Nearly 800,000 Americans suffer a stroke every year.

Markidan added that although cutting back on cigarettes can reduce your stroke risk, only quitting altogether can slash your odds dramatically.

“These findings can offer hope for quitters, as former smokers had a stroke risk that was closer to never smokers than to current smokers,” she said.

The relationship between cigarette smoking and cardiovascular disease has been known for a long time, said neurologist Dr. Richard Libman.

ideal healthy living tips
Photocred: hivplusmag.com

“Cigarette smoking may accelerate atherosclerosis, popularly known as hardening of the arteries, and also increase the chances of forming blood clots,” explained Libman. He’s vice chair of neurology at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y.

“A specific relationship between smoking and risk of stroke in young men is what has been clarified in the study,” said Libman, who wasn’t involved with the research.

It’s clear smoking increases your risk for stroke, Libman said. He agreed the best means of prevention is to quit.

For the study, Markidan and her colleagues collected data on 615 males ages 15 to 49 who had had a stroke in the past three years.

The men were compared with 530 similarly aged healthy men. Participants were categorized as never smokers, former smokers or current smokers.

Current smokers were placed into groups based on how many cigarettes they smoked daily — 1 to 10, 11 to 20, 21 to 39, or 40 or more.

Some factors the researchers didn’t take into account might have affected the findings. These include whether the men used other tobacco products in addition to cigarettes, if they drank alcohol, were physically active, or if they reported their smoking habits correctly.

The report was published online April 19 in the journal Stroke.

author’s opinion

Smoking has ben known to be a dangerous habit and one of the hardest to get rid of. According to the report there is continuously rise of smokers in young males. This has been caused by young people being exposed to too much unhealthy habits around them.

Although it may be hard to quit the habit all together at once, here are my healthy living tips to help you curb the habit of smoking to assist increasing your health and ultimately your lifespan:

  1. When the urgent of smoking starts think of as many negative things in my cause for you in the future i.e Death, stroke, disability.
  2. Replace the urge of wanting to smoke with something else to increase your healthy living ways.
  3. Strive to smoke half of what you smoke normally while applying the above points
  4. do not kill yourself if you fail, Just find out why you failed at it and correct it and never do it again.

If you would like to read the full article of the above please click here

Learning to maintain lost weight is more important than losing it

Healthy living tips for maintaining lost weight

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Photocred: bodysculptor

7 steps to help maintain weight loss for life

As a registered dietitian, many of my appointments with patients begin with harrowing tales of weight-loss programs from the past. Patients discuss details about why one worked over another and how much weight was lost in each.

Unfortunately, the majority of these attempts all end on the same note: gaining all, or more, of the weight back. Thousands of references are available to consumers on how to lose weight. However, very few sources identify, perhaps, the most important piece of the puzzle — how to keep the weight off. Here are some tips to help you manage the weight you worked so hard to lose.

1. Increase the exercise and decrease the calories

Imagine picking up two 10-pound weights and taking a 1-mile walk. It would be challenging to accomplish. Your body would have to work harder to compensate for the extra weight. Now drop the weights. Take the same walk. That exercise should be much easier. Your body is now more efficient, and the calories you’ll burn will go down. That’s exactly what happens when you lose 20 pounds.

To keep the weight off, you need to challenge your body by decreasing calories even further in some cases (because your body is not working as hard to get you from point A to point B anymore) and stepping it up on the exercise front. In fact, a 2014 study that followed individuals who lost weight and tracked their maintenance success, found those who maintained the most weight loss reported high levels of physical activity as well as a diet that was consistently low in calories and fat.

2. Weigh yourself often

The same study mentioned above also found individuals who successfully maintained their weight weighed themselves several times a week. A 2015 study found weighing in daily was equally effective, especially in men. The scale may be a good monitor of weight that may be creeping in.

Though if you find that you’re obsessing over the number on the scale, you may want to weigh yourself just once a week.

3. Consider a weight-loss program with a maintenance component

There are various methods of weight loss and as many experts to help see you through it. One study, which followed patients for 56 weeks after successful weight loss, found individuals who engaged in group visits as well as telephonic coaching maintained more weight loss than those who had no intervention at all. The study concluded having a maintenance routine in commercial and clinical settings could set the stage for better success at keeping weight off.

The take away? After you lose the weight, find a coach or a dietitian who can keep track of your maintenance habits for at least two years (the time period that predicts even further long-term success).

4. Work on your maintenance skills before losing weight

One study showed if you focus on maintenance behaviors first you’ll be more successful in the end. The study found women who engaged in eight weeks of maintenance skills regained less weight than women who did not focus on these behaviors beforehand. In the group of women who focused on maintenance first, they learned about energy-balance principles including: controlling portions without feeling deprived or dissatisfied, the importance of being physically active, weighing in daily to monitor fluctuations in weight, learning how to make small and easy adjustments to lifestyle habits, and navigating inevitable disruptions with confidence.

5. Up the ante

Research out of Duke found when participants were offered cash rewards for weight loss and maintenance, they were more successful with their weight-loss programs. The bottom line? Engage in workplace weight-loss programs that provide a monetary benefit for weight loss or structure a program yourself.

For every 10 pounds of weight loss, you can set aside a reward that is meaningful to you. For every three months of maintenance, set even bigger rewards such as a trip or a new wardrobe. Additionally, including family members and friends who are willing to contribute to the weight-loss pot (tell them it’s an investment in your health) may increase motivation even further.

6. Get a social communication plan in place

If you’ve ever lost weight, you know not everyone is happy to hear about your success. A 2017 study referred to negative behavior by others as you find weight-loss bliss as “lean stigma.” Researchers also found certain communication techniques could help in maintaining weight loss without compromising relationships. These included saving a “cheat night” for dinner out with friends, accepting unhealthy food options from friends but not eating them, or eating very small portions of unhealthy foods at family gatherings.

7. Don’t give up

This is hard stuff. Don’t throw in the towel if you gain back your weight. Using the “I’m a failure” approach may have you reverting back to bad habits, putting weight on and never getting back on track. Stay on the weight-loss wagon. Don’t lose sight of the hard work you’ve already put in.

Kristin Kirkpatrick, MS, R.D., is the manager of wellness nutrition services at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute in Cleveland, Ohio, and the author of “Skinny Liver.” Follow her on Twitter @KristinKirkpat. For more diet and fitness advice, sign up for our One Small Thing newsletter.

Reference for the above articles is: TODAY

Short term diet change will lead to more life for your on earth

A tiny change in a healthy diet can lead to an increased in lifespan even for old aged people

Better Diet, Longer Life?

A large study suggests you’re never too old to benefit from a commitment to eating healthier

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photocred: weightlossforall.com

 

By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Middle-aged and older adults who start eating better also tend to live longer, a large new study shows.

The findings, reported in the July 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, might not sound surprising. Health experts said they basically reinforce messages people have been hearing for years.

But the study is the first to show that sustained diet changes — even later in life — might extend people’s lives, the researchers said.

“A main take-home message is that it’s never too late to improve diet quality,” said lead researcher Mercedes Sotos-Prieto, a visiting scientist at the Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston.

“Most participants in our study were 60 years or older,” she noted.

The findings are based on nearly 74,000 U.S. health professionals who were part of two long-running studies that began in the 1970s and 1980s.

Between 1998 and 2010, almost 10,000 of those study participants died. Sotos-Prieto and her team looked at how people’s risk of early death related to any diet changes they’d made in the previous 12 years (1986 to 1998).

It turned out that people who had changed for the better — adding more fruits and vegetables and whole grains, for example — had a lower risk of premature death than those whose diets stayed the same.

In contrast, people who let their eating habits slide faced a higher risk of dying during the study period — 6 percent to 12 percent higher — compared to stable eaters, the findings showed.

How much of a difference did diet improvements make?

It varied a bit based on the measure of diet quality. The researchers used three scoring systems: the Alternate Healthy Eating Index; the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score; and the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet score.

The scoring systems differ somewhat, but all give more points to foods such as vegetables, fruit, whole grains, fish, low-fat dairy and sources of “good” fats, such as olive oil and nuts. Processed foods, sweets, red meat and butter, meanwhile, get lower ratings.

Overall, the study found, a 20-percentile improvement in diet quality was linked to an 8 percent to 17 percent decrease in the risk of early death from any cause. There was a similar dip in the risk of dying from heart disease or stroke, specifically.

That 20-percentile shift is a fairly minor change, according to Sotos-Prieto.

Swapping out one daily serving of red meat for one serving of legumes or nuts, for example, would do the trick, she said.

“Our results underscore the concept that modest improvements in diet quality over time could meaningfully influence mortality risk,” Sotos-Prieto said.

Alice Lichtenstein is a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association and a professor of nutrition science at Tufts University, in Boston.

“This study reinforces what we’ve been saying for a long time,” she said.

Ideally, healthy eating is a lifelong habit. But you’re never “too old” to make changes for the better, Lichtenstein noted.

“The key is to make changes that you can stick with for the rest of your life,” she stressed.

There are no magic-bullet foods or nutrients, Lichtenstein added. Instead, the new study “validates” the concept that it’s overall diet that matters, she explained.

Connie Diekman, a registered dietitian, agreed. A general guide, she said, is to start eating more plant foods.

When people do eat meat, Diekman suggested choosing leaner cuts.

“Shifting one meal from meat and potatoes to sauteed veggies, quinoa and a topping of grilled chicken or lean flank steak would be one way to move to a healthier eating pattern,” said Diekman, head of university nutrition at Washington University in St. Louis.

The good news, according to Lichtenstein, is that it is getting easier to eat healthfully. She said Americans generally have more access to a variety of whole grains and fruits and vegetables — fresh or frozen, which can be more economical.

Reference for the above story is Healthday

 

 

 

Avoiding eating unhealthy in the office

Healthy eating is vital to ensure in the office as most people spend their time there.

7 weight loss roadblocks you may encounter in your office

It’s easy to trip up on our diet and exercise goals when holed up in an office all day. But that doesn’t mean you have to surrender in the battle of the bulge.

HOW EATING CARBS CAN HELP YOU MEET YOUR WEIGHT LOSS GOALS

Fox News spoke with Lauren Blake, a dietitian at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, and Angel Planells, a Seattle-based dietitian and spokesman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, about some common diet mistakes people make at work, and how to fix them:

1. You sit for hours on end.
Sitting too long can really sabotage weight loss goals because every movement counts, Blake said. Try taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or go for a brief walk around the office every 30 – 45 minutes, Planells recommended.

2. You aren’t prepared for a hunger attack.
If you don’t have healthy snacks on hand, you’re more likely to head for the vending machine or mindlessly reach into the office candy jar. Blake and Planells recommended keeping healthy snacks like fruit and nuts on hand.

6 WAYS TO LOSE MORE WEIGHT AS YOU AGE

3. You suffer from on-the-job stress.
Chronic stress can trigger cortisol, a stress hormone that leads to fat storage and sugar cravings, Blake said. Try taking deep breaths, giving yourself small breaks, or going for a walk to manage your stress levels, she recommended.

4. You eat at your desk.
Eating at our desks “is a big no-no,” Planells told Fox News. When you do so, you’re not as mindful of what you’re eating, and you may overeat, he explained. Opt for a common dining area instead.

5. You don’t get enough sunshine.
Studies have shown sun exposure is associated with a lower BMI, so try to get some sunlight throughout the day, Blake recommended.

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6. You forget to pack your lunch.
If you don’t pack your lunch, you’re more likely to rely on fast food, Blake explained. Commit to packing a lunch one to two days per week. If you do eat out, “look for any way you can add vegetables,” Blake said, whether that’s a salad or lean protein and veggies. Or, opt for a soup and salad, Planells suggested.

7. Your coworkers’ bad habits rub off on you.
Sometimes, you may be tempted to go out more with your coworkers, or else partake in some of the decadent treats or snacks they bring, Planells said. Even if you can’t abstain from the treats, Planells said, try just taking a small portion — a half or a quarter of a donut, for instance.

 

Reference for the article is Fox news

 

less trans fat better heart health research finds

Eliminating trans fat in your diet is a healthy way of living

Trans Fat Bans Tied to Fewer Heart Attacks and Strokes

Laws that restrict adding trans fats to foods have had immediate beneficial effects on heart health, new research has found.

The Food and Drug Administration plans to restrict the use of trans fats in foods nationwide in 2018, but between 2007 and 2011, some counties in New York State, but not others, banned trans fatty acids in restaurants, bakeries, soup kitchens, park concessions and other public places where food is served. In a natural experiment to test the effect of the ban, researchers compared nine counties with trans fat restrictions to eight that had none.

Cardiovascular disease has been declining nationwide in recent years, but the decline was even steeper in counties where trans fats were banned. Three years after restrictions were imposed, there was an additional 6.2 percent decline in hospital admissions for heart attacks and strokes in counties that banned trans fats compared with those that did not. The study, in JAMA Cardiology, accounted for age and other demographic factors.

“The most important message from these data is that they confirm what we predicted — benefit in the reduction of heart attacks and strokes,” said the lead author, Dr. Eric J. Brandt, a fellow in cardiovascular medicine at Yale. “This is a well-planned and well-executed public policy.”

The above article is from New York Times

Increase of sodium over the years is being a concern

High blood pressure is from high Soduim diets in America

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Photocred: Honeybadgermom.com

Americans With High Blood Pressure Still Eating Too Much Salt

Average sodium intake more than double the recommended daily limit for these patients, study finds

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For Americans with high blood pressure, cutting back on salt is an important way to help keep the condition under control. Yet, new research shows that these patients are getting more salt in their diet than they did in 1999.

Between 1999 and 2012, salt (sodium) consumption rose from about 2,900 milligrams a day (mg/day) to 3,350 mg/day. That’s more than double the ideal upper limit of 1,500 mg/day of sodium recommended by the American Heart Association for people with high blood pressure (or “hypertension”).

One teaspoon of table salt contains about 2,300 mg of sodium. Salt also contains chloride, but it’s the sodium that’s concerning for heart and blood pressure problems.

Sodium is an essential nutrient that helps control water balance in the body. But too much can cause excess water to build up, increasing blood pressure, and putting a strain on the heart and blood vessels, according to the heart association.

“You really need to watch the salt in your diet, especially if you are hypertensive,” said study senior author Dr. Sameer Bansilal. He is an assistant professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

“People who eat too much salt are more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension, and they may suffer from complications of hypertension, like heart and kidney dysfunction, and heart attack and stroke,” he said.

According to Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, “These findings question the effectiveness of interventions to reduce salt consumption among hypertensive adults.”

For the study, Bansilal and colleagues collected data on more than 13,000 men and women who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2012. All of the participants had high blood pressure. Their average age was 60.

Daily sodium intake increased among people with high blood pressure by more than 14 percent overall from 1999 to 2012, the findings showed.

Among Hispanics and blacks, sodium consumption increased 26 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Among whites, sodium consumption increased 2 percent, the researchers found.

“Whites always had a higher salt consumption, so it’s not like they’re in a good place, it’s more like they were in a bad place and stayed there, and blacks and Hispanics caught up from being in a better place to being in a bad place as well,” Bansilal said.

People with the lowest salt consumption included those who had already had a heart attack or stroke, those taking blood pressure medications, people with diabetes, obese people and those with heart failure, he said.

“At least these people seemed to have taken the message to heart and have lowered their salt intake, so that’s reassuring,” Bansilal said.

For people without high blood pressure, U.S. dietary guidelines recommend a daily maximum of one teaspoon of salt a day (2,300 mg of sodium), Bansilal said.

Samantha Heller is senior clinical nutritionist at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. She said, “You may not think you are eating too much salt, but consider this: just one teaspoon of table salt has about 2,300 mg of sodium.”

And, she added, most of the sodium in your diet probably doesn’t come from your salt shaker.

“Over 75 percent of the salt we eat comes from packaged and prepared foods. Only about 15 to 20 percent comes from the salt shaker,” Heller said.

 

Sources of high-salt foods include highly processed, store-bought and prepared foods, such as soups, pizza, breads, sauces and cold cuts. Sodium is also in products such as baking soda, baking powder, monosodium glutamate (MSG), disodium phosphate, garlic salt, sodium benzoate and other additives, she said.

“Because some of these compounds are added to foods for shelf-life, texture and as a preservative or flavor enhancer, the food may not taste salty,” Heller said. “That does not mean that the salt content is not high.”

The World Health Organization predicts that an estimated 2.5 million deaths could be prevented each year if global salt consumption were reduced to the recommended level.

Heller suggested that “cooking from scratch at home more often is the easiest way to slash salt in our diets.”

The results of the study are scheduled to be presented March 19 at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting, in Washington, D.C. Findings presented at meetings are generally considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Reference for the above article is HealthDay

Aurthor’s opinion

It is clear that the sodium consumption increases as the years go on. This is due, in large to the processed food that is being done in my opinion. My advice would be to get into the habit of not adding salt into your diet, well this is a habit I have been doing for three years and it has done wonders to my health. I also Advice substituting bread with veggie or brown rice as these are a healthier way of living.

A healthy version of food has entered the market

Kosher has take lots of households by storm

healthy living tips
cred:muslimmatters.org

Is Kosher Food Healthier?

When you go to the supermarket, you’ll see labels that appeal to all kinds of consumers, from the environmentally-conscious (“organic”) to the allergic (“dairy-free”). You’ll also see a label – “kosher” – originally intended to appeal to people who choose to eat that way to honor their religion. The label means the foods have been prepared in accordance with a set of specific, intricate biblical laws that detail not only which foods people of the Jewish faith can eat, but also how the food is prepared and processed.

Apparently, plenty of folks of all religions are gravitating toward the label. According to a report citing data from the market research firm Mintel, “kosher” was the top label claim on new foods and beverages launched in 2014, with 41 percent of such products donning the tag. Why? Likely because consumers seem to believe kosher items are safer, since they are produced under stricter supervision than the basic food supply, which is overseen by government inspection. Food safety, however, has more to do with how a food is handled (cleanliness) and stored (proper cooking and storage temperatures) than a religious practice.

So what is unique about kosher foods, and how can “kosher” on the label benefit you? Here’s what we know:

  • You can be assured that the overseeing and certification of kosher food is done under rigorous conditions and by the use of guidelines that are never abandoned. Unlike government regulations, these are laws that will not change. Once a kosher label is placed on a food, there is no negotiation about certain characteristics of that particular product.
  • If you are lactose intolerant, have an allergy to dairy products or follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, you can be sure that if a product is marked “pareve” or “parve,” it absolutely does not contain any meat, milk or dairy, nor has it come in contact with such products. There is not a chance that there will be a mistake.
  • Kosher foods will not contain some colorants like carmine that are derived from insects, even though such additives may be considered “natural” in other products.
  • Kosher pareve products are permitted to contain eggs, honey and fish. These foods may not correspond with the dietary laws of Hinduism or a vegan diet, so be sure to read the ingredient list carefully.
  • Kosher salt is lower in sodium content than table salt. By comparison, 1 teaspoon of kosher salt contains 1,120 milligrams of sodium, while the same amount of table salt provides about 2,400 milligrams. This is not an invitation to start shaking things up at the table. The only reason kosher salt is lower in sodium is because it has a larger grain. The larger the grain, the more space it takes up, therefore kosher salt has less sodium by volume, not by weight. By weight, all forms of salt contain about the same amount of sodium. (Meat and skin of kosher poultry, however, can have four to six times as much sodium as non-kosher poultry due to the salt that’s used in the process of making them kosher.)

Interestingly, the word “kosher” means “fit.” Although kosher foods are carefully watched over and controlled, that doesn’t mean choosing kosher foods will automatically keep you fit. The “kosher” label tells us nothing about the calorie, sugar, fat or nutritional profile of a food, so try to keep the preservation of health in mind while preserving tradition.

The above article is from US NEWS

Learning to gain weight is as important as learning to loose it

Weight gain can be done in an effective way

Cred:Mxzide.net

 

How to Gain Weight in a Healthy Way

It can be as difficult as losing weight for some people

Just like losing weight is a goal for some people, gaining weight is a goal for many others. And figuring out how to gain weight can be equally as difficult, for many different reasons. Factors like genetics, medications, stress, chronic health problems, and mental health struggles like depression, anxiety, or an eating disorder, can all make putting on weight a physical and mental challenge.

“We constantly hear about the obesity epidemic, and our society places such an emphasis on weight loss and dieting, but there are so many individuals out there who are struggling with the opposite problem,” Marla Scanzello, M.S., R.D., director of dietary service at Eating Recovery Center, tells SELF. “It is essential for [those individuals] to recognize that their needs are different and to tune out the unhelpful dieting and weight loss messages surrounding them,” Scanzello adds.

The truth is that for some people, being their healthiest self means gaining some weight. “Being underweight puts you at risk for a variety of health issues, including fragile bones, fertility issues, hair loss, a weakened immune system, fatigue, and malnutrition,” Alissa Rumsey, M.S., R.D., C.S.C.S., spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF.

Of course, healthy weight ranges will be different for every person. If you’re not sure what that means for you, definitely talk with your general physician or a registered dietitian. This is tricky, and what works for your friends won’t necessarily work for you, so it’s essential to do what’s right for your body and keeps you nourished, happy, and healthy.

(If you have an eating disorder, seeking help from a treatment center, or just a trusted doctor, is essential. You should not change your diet, count calories, or try to put on weight on your own before speaking with a professional who can help you come up with the right plan for you.)

If you are looking for ways to make weight gain easier, here are some tips for doing so in a healthy way.

Go get a physical.

If you don’t already know why weight gain is tough for you, it’s a good idea to see your doctor. Some chronic health conditions like hyperthyroidism and some digestive issues like Crohn’s disease can cause weight loss. You may also just have a very high metabolism, Rumsey says. Figuring out the underlying cause (if there is one) and treating that will help you reach your goals.

Do a mental health check.

“Some people may lose weight during times of stress or depression and need to regain weight for optimal health,” Scanzello says. “In these cases, it may also be helpful for them to see a therapist to address the underlying emotional issues contributing to lack of appetite and/or weight loss.”

Weight problems can be a physical symptom of stress, so check in on yourself and assess your stress levels. If you realize you need to get them in check, or that you’re struggling with other things like depression or anxiety, seeing a therapist can help you sort things out.

Eat smaller meals throughout the day.

“Often it can feel overwhelming to sit down to a large plate of food, so start out by eating more frequent meals,” Rumsey suggests. “Eating every two to three hours can help you get a lot of calories in without feeling stuffed.” It can also help mitigate some of the GI discomfort you may feel. “When individuals who have lost a significant amount of weight start increasing their food intake, they often experience uncomfortable physical symptoms, such as constipation, gas, bloating, and stomach pain,” Scanzello says. It may just be more comfortable physically to spread out the extra food needed to gain weight throughout the day.

Drink smoothies and shakes.

Energy-dense liquids are an easy way to take in more calories without feeling too uncomfortably full. “It is often easier to drink a lot of calories than to eat those calories via real food,” Rumsey notes. You can also pack them with vitamins and nutrients, and drink them on the go. Other calorically dense drinks can help, too. “Caloric fluids like milk and juice can also be added or used to replace fluids, such as water and diet drinks, to help meet energy needs for weight gain,” Scanzello says. Just be cautious of how much sugar you’re drinking—excess sugar can have negative health consequences, and you don’t want to fill up on sugar instead of nutrient-rich foods.

Focus on calorically dense but healthy foods.

It’s really important that you’re getting a healthy mix of nutrients, not just calories. “Weight gain due to more calories from unhealthy food sources like large amounts of salty, greasy, sugary, highly processed foods can cause other health problems down the road, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and heart disease,” Rumsey says.

Also, if you’re not loading up on healthful foods, you run the risk of remaining malnourished even after putting on weight. “It is best to increase food intake with a variety of foods and balance of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins to help replenish nutritional status,” Scanzello says. She suggests focusing on energy-dense foods, such as nuts, oils, dried fruit, granola, peanut butter, and other spreads and fats.

Cut back on cardio.

Scanzello emphasizes that for some people, exercise can be dangerous until you’ve reached a certain weight. “It is best to be medically cleared for exercise if underweight,” she says. If you’ve talked to your doctor and are given the go-ahead, Rumsey says stick to strength training over cardio. “For people looking to gain weight, I recommend an exercise regimen of mostly strength training, with very little cardio,” she says. Yes, you’ll still burn some calories lifting weights, but you will also put on muscle mass. Exercising a bit may also help stimulate your appetite, giving you an extra nudge toward reaching your goals.

Reference for the above article is SELF

Author’s opinion

Most people are only familiar with loosing weight, this leave the other population unaware of how they can gain weight. This overlooking of gaining weight leads to the belief that only being over weight is a problem. However it is vital to know that being underweight is just as dangerous as being over weight. Having a small body from a young age I can attest to the fact that it is extremely difficult to gain weight in a healthy way as the popular belief is that one needs to indulge in fatty foods to accomplish such feat. This is what leads to young people having conditions such as high cholesterol.

Are you irritated by certain noises

Unhealthy noise can be very irritating

Why Certain Noises Really Irritate Some People

‘Misophonia’ is a disorder that can make a person’s brain go into overdrive, researchers report

Most people can recall a time when a certain sound annoyed them — say when your office mate was repeatedly clicking his pen — but some people find such sounds utterly unbearable. And new research suggests that brain abnormalities may explain why.

People with a disorder called misophonia have an intense hatred of specific sounds, such as chewing, breathing or repeated pen clicking. These triggers can cause an immediate and strong “fight or flight” response in those with the disorder.

“I hope this will reassure sufferers,” the study’s senior author Tim Griffiths said in a news release from Newcastle University.

“I was part of the skeptical community myself until we saw patients in the clinic and understood how strikingly similar the features are,” he added. Griffiths is a professor of cognitive neurology at Newcastle University and University College London in the United Kingdom.

The researchers conducted brain scans of 20 people with misophonia. They also conducted brain scans on 22 healthy people for comparison. Among those with the condition, brain scans showed an abnormality in their emotional control mechanism that puts their brains into overdrive when they hear trigger sounds.

The scans also revealed that brain activity in people with the disorder originates from a different connectivity pattern in the frontal lobe. This area normally suppresses an abnormal reaction to sounds, the study authors explained.

In addition, the researchers found that trigger sounds had physical effects, such as increased heart rate and sweating in people with misophonia.

The findings may help eventually lead to treatments for this condition, said Griffiths. The study may also prompt researchers to look for similar changes in the brain in other disorders associated with “abnormal emotional reactions,” he said.

Study leader Sukhbinder Kumar added that “for many people with misophonia, this will come as welcome news, as for the first time we have demonstrated a difference in brain structure and function in sufferers.” Kumar is also from the Institute of Neuroscience at Newcastle University and University College London.

Kumar said people with this disorder had very similar signs and symptoms. “Yet, the syndrome is not recognized in any of the current clinical diagnostic schemes. This study demonstrates the critical brain changes as further evidence to convince a skeptical medical community that this is a genuine disorder,” he said in the news release.

“My hope is to identify the brain signature of the trigger sounds — those signatures can be used for treatment, such as for neuro-feedback for example, where people can self-regulate their reactions by looking at what kind of brain activity is being produced,” Kumar said.

The findings were published Feb. 3 in the journal Current Biology.

Reference for the above article is WebMD