Too much money spent on fitness

healthy living doesn’t have to include high expensive fitness costs

healthy living tips

Why You’re Paying So Much to Exercise

Millennials are turning the fitness industry upside down.

On a frigid Sunday this month, Rianka Dorsainvil, a 29-year-old financial planner outside Washington, D.C., found herself running up a steep, snowy hill wearing a 20-pound vest and dragging a 215-pound man behind her.

She was paying for the privilege. The man harnessed to her was her personal trainer, who runs a studio out of his home and micromanages not just Dorsainvil’s workouts but her meals, too. She calls him the “mad scientist.”

“It’s great to have an expert pushing you in the right direction,” she said.

A growing segment of the U.S. population is making a significant sacrifice for physical fitness, and not just in sore muscles and pre-dawn wake-ups. More and more people are paying hundreds of dollars a month, or thousands a year, for personal workouts, special classes, and ever more luxurious gyms.

Dorsainvil and her husband, a technology consultant, spend about 10 percent of their monthly budget getting fit, she figures. That includes training, memberships to a gym where she starts her day at 4:30 a.m., and the bulked-up grocery bills, including supplements, that fuel all that exercise.

By contrast, the average American spends a minuscule amount on getting in shape. Almost one-fifth of Americans are health club members, and the average U.S. club dues are $54 a month, or 1.2 percent of median household income, according to the latest data from the International Health, Racquet & Sportsclub Association, or Ihrsa, the fitness industry trade group.

Even if you stick with a regular gym, though, your dues have probably been going up. Traditional health clubs held off on price increases in the years after the recession but are now feeling squeezed by rising costs and new competition robbing them of longtime members.

Thousands of boutique gyms have opened, each with a niche. Studios feature one-on-one training and group classes in CrossFit, cycling and spinning, kickboxing, barre, boot camp training, yoga, pilates, martial arts, high-intensity interval training (HIIT), indoor rock climbing, and countless others hoping to be the next fitness fad

They aren’t cheap. SoulCycle, the popular cycling studio brand, costs $34 a class, or a discounted $850 for 30 classes, in New York. Go three times a week for a year and that’s at least $4,420.

Luxury gyms are also seeing brisk business. Equinox opened 10 new clubs last year, bringing its total to 86. In New York, where a third of Equinox clubs are located, monthly memberships can start above $200 a month.

Many of the most enthusiastic exercisers are millennials, a generation that would appear least able to cover the extra costs. Weighed down by student debt and living in cities with skyrocketing rents, young urban dwellers still shell out $20 to $40 for an hourlong class and $50 to $100 or more for a personal training session.

One way they save money is disloyalty. Ihrsa estimates that 86 percent of patrons of studio gyms also visit or are members of other gyms. You could mix your SoulCycle with some equally pricey kickboxing or CrossFit, but there are also many new cheaper options. Even as Dorsainvil pays up for a trainer, her main gym costs her just $10 a month.

Hers is one of a wave of budget gyms, costing $20 or less a month, that have swept across the U.S. since the recession. The idea is to offer exercise equipment without extras. Planet Fitness, for example, has 1,200 locations in 47 states and has plans to grow to 4,000 clubs in the U.S.

While midmarket clubs barely gained members, the number of budget club members grew 69 percent in 2015 alone, Ihrsa estimated last year. Much of this growth is driven by franchising, a trend that has brought outside money to the fitness industry. Entrepreneurs who might have opened a sandwich shop are opening a franchise of Planet Fitness or Blink Fitness, which is a budget brand owned by Equinox.

Fitness was already a cutthroat industry. Clubs face a constant churn of members. About 30 percent of the people who signed up for clubs in 2014 were gone a year later, Ihrsa estimates.

“There are more former club members than there are present ones,” Stephen Tharrett, co-founder and principal of the consulting firm ClubIntel, said.

January is the most popular month to join a gym. It’s also when many clubs raise their dues, a process that risks prompting members to leave. “It’s always scary when you raise dues, because you don’t know how many members you’re going to lose,” said Bill McBride, a fitness club consultant and chief executive officer and co-founder of Active Wellness LLC, which runs more than 60 fitness facilities across the U.S.

Many clubs have no choice. Unless they constantly renovate and reinvent themselves, older clubs won’t attract new members to replace those who are leaving, McBride said. Many health clubs are also facing higher rents and rising labor costs thanks to increases in the minimum wage in many parts of the country. The arrival of new studios and budget clubs makes the competition even more intense.

“The number of health club members has been increasing,” McBride said, “but the number of clubs has been increasing exponentially more.”

Shortly before Christmas, DavidBartonGym declared bankruptcy and abruptly shut down eight high-end clubs in New York, Boston, Miami, Chicago, and outside Seattle. The chain blamed “severe competitive pressures, particularly in New York.” 1 DavidBartonGym locations in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Honolulu are owned by a separate company and remain open.

Expect more clubs to close and consolidate, said ClubIntel’s Tharrett. Even studio clubs could feel squeezed. In some cities, you see “four or five different studios on the same block,” he said. “Something has to give.”

Studios have plenty of advantages. They’re designed to be social. Customers keep coming back because of personal relationships with instructors and other clients. Serious exercisers need to be constantly challenged, and personal attention makes that easier.

Studios can also make extra money off customers by selling merchandise, like T-shirts and hats, or energy snacks and drinks. With “highly specialized, tribal experiences,” Tharrett said, a studio “creates a sense of belonging.”

Still, fashions change. If customers get bored of cycling or rock climbing, there’s no membership contract to keep them from trying something new. A notorious example is the fitness chain Curves, which rapidly opened, and then shut, thousands of locations across the U.S.

In fitness studios, “the barriers to entry might be very low, but the barriers to success are very high,” said IBISWorld analyst Andrew Alvarez. Plus, “there’s only so much money you can extract out of your core demographic before your revenue flatlines.”

So far, there’s little evidence that members of studios and luxury gyms are tightening their belts. Overall, Ihrsa estimates the health club industry’s revenues jumped 6.1 percent in 2015, to $25.8 billion. Veterans of the fitness industry sound surprised that gyms’ youngest clients are acting less price-sensitive than older generations. Why are millennials willing to pay hundreds of dollars a month?

“I have no idea,” except that “they’ve made fitness a priority,” said Rick Caro, a consultant at Management Vision and former club owner with 43 years of experience.

Dorsainvil has a theory. “Our generation is a generation of multitaskers,” she said. “It’s only when we’re working out that we really get to concentrate on one thing.”

Debbie Freeman, a 35-year-old financial planner in Denver, agrees. “I use exercise as a way to pull myself away from the day-to-day grind,” said the mother of a 4-year-old and 6-year-old. “It’s the one time of the day when I can do something by myself and for myself.”

Freeman spends significantly less than Dorsainvil on exercise. She’s not interested in crowding into a group studio or meeting up in the park for a boot camp. Instead, she mostly runs outside. Her only expenses are a $20-a-month gym and the occasional entry fee for a half marathon or 10K race.

Are people who spend thousands of dollars on fitness wasting their money? Neither of the two financial planners thinks so.

If you’re meeting your retirement and other savings goals, “who am I to say you’re spending too much?” said Dorsainvil, who started her own planning firm, Your Greatest Contribution, about a year ago. “You only get one body.”

Freeman, the director of tax and financial planning at Peak Financial Advisors, has a friend who pays more than $200 a month at a CrossFit gym. “It keeps her accountable,” she said. “The money is a motivator for her to go do it.”

Whatever works for you, Freeman said. “The shape you’re in from your 30s to 50s is going to affect the shape you’re in in your 70s and 80s.” If clients need to cut their budgets, she advises them to start with alcohol or restaurants or cable.

Exercise? “That’s one of the last places I’m going to tell them to slice,” she said

The above article can be found at Bloomberg

Sitting done too long may shorten your lifespan

Healthy living requires lots of exercise as that is linked to less aging in your cells

healthy living tips

Credit:Viralnovalty.net

Too much sitting, too little exercise may accelerate biological aging

Older women with low physical activity and 10 hours of daily sit time had even ‘older’ cells

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary.

The study, publishing online January 18 in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found elderly women with less than 40 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day and who remain sedentary for more than 10 hours per day have shorter telomeres — tiny caps found on the ends of DNA strands, like the plastic tips of shoelaces, that protect chromosomes from deterioration and progressively shorten with age.

As a cell ages, its telomeres naturally shorten and fray, but health and lifestyle factors, such as obesity and smoking, may accelerate that process. Shortened telomeres are associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and major cancers.

“Our study found cells age faster with a sedentary lifestyle. Chronological age doesn’t always match biological age,” said Aladdin Shadyab, PhD, lead author of the study with the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Shadyab and his research team believe they are the first to objectively measure how the combination of sedentary time and exercise can impact the aging biomarker.

Nearly 1,500 women, ages 64 to 95, participated in the study. The women are part of the larger Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), a national, longitudinal study investigating the determinants of chronic diseases in postmenopausal women. The participants completed questionnaires and wore an accelerometer on their right hip for seven consecutive days during waking and sleeping hours to track their movements.

“We found that women who sat longer did not have shorter telomere length if they exercised for at least 30 minutes a day, the national recommended guideline,” said Shadyab. “Discussions about the benefits of exercise should start when we are young, and physical activity should continue to be part of our daily lives as we get older, even at 80 years old.”

Shadyab said future studies will examine how exercise relates to telomere length in younger populations and in men.

Reference for the above article is ScienceDaily

My opinion

As we keep seeing along the years that the human body is not only required to have exercise but it actually needs exercise in order for it to work optimally. Most studies seem to have a common theme about this topic of exercise and health. It is evident that each of us sets at least 30 minutes a day for exercises as a commitment. In the condition I had exercise proved to be a must as far as my recovery was concerned. Now I apply exercises daily to ensure the momentum. Remember it does have to be a long rigorous workout: moderate exercises at different times of the day do the trick.

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Cellphone is said to pose danger in your fitness routine

Cellphones have become an integral part of our lives but studies reveal how dangerous on your health and fitness

healthy living tips

Photocred:Actorfit

Why you shouldn’t use your cell phone while exercising

Do you really need your mobile when you’re working out? Researchers say talking and texting during exercise can cause all sorts of problems.

Talking or texting on your cell phone may spell trouble during exercise, researchers say.

Divided attention

In two studies, they found that talking or texting on a cell phone during a workout lowers the intensity of your exercise session. More importantly, the study team noted that cell phone use affects balance, which can increase your risk of injuries.

“If you’re talking or texting on your cell phone while you’re putting in your daily steps, your attention is divided between the two tasks and that can disrupt your postural stability, and therefore, possibly predispose individuals to other greater inherent risks such as falls and musculoskeletal injuries,” study author Michael Rebold, assistant professor of integrative exercise science at Hiram College in Ohio, said in a school news release.

Specifically, texting on a cell phone reduced postural stability by 45 percent. Even talking on a cell phone reduced postural stability by 19 percent.

But, if you want to pump up your workout with some tunes, go right ahead. Listening to music on a cell phone had no significant effect on postural stability during a workout, according to the study of 45 college students.

The studies about the effects of cell phone use during workouts were published in the journals Computers in Human Behaviour and Performance Enhancement & Health.

Reference for the above article is Health24

My opinion

It is evident that cellphone, although with their good benefits they give to use, they also have a huge disadvantage in our health. Although research dismisses cellphones as an item which disturbs us it is vital to know that they can be a great tool that the health sector can use to benefit us rather then disturb us. This can be done but incorporating vital apps o tools in the cellphones that will help to give us more out of the device or at least inhibiting apps for exercises.

Exercising only on weekends is considered to be the best way to a healthy you,a study reveals

Exercising on weekend for health is seen to produce great results

Weekend exercise alone ‘has significant health benefits’

ideal healthy living tips

Photocred:healthcuretips.com

Cramming all your recommended weekly exercise into one or two weekend sessions is enough to produce important health benefits, a study suggests.

And being active without managing 150 minutes of moderate activity a week was still enough to reduce the risk of an early death by a third.

The findings are based on a survey of about 64,000 adults aged over 40 in England and Scotland.

Health experts said purposeful exercise was key to better health.

Researchers from Loughborough University and the University of Sydney analysed data on the time people spent doing exercise and their health over 18 years.

They found that no matter how often people exercised in a week or for how long, the health benefits were similar as long as they met the activity guidelines.

Fighting the flab

This was good news for people with a busy lifestyle who turned into “weekend warriors” in order to fit in all their recommended physical activity, they said.

Compared with those who didn’t exercise at all, people who did some kind of physical activity – whether regularly or irregularly – showed a lower risk of dying from cancer and from cardiovascular disease (CVD), which can lead to heart attacks and strokes.

“Weekend warriors”, who did all their exercise on one or two days of the week, were found to lower their risk of dying from CVD by 41% and cancer by 18%, compared with the inactive.

Those who exercised regularly on three or more days per week reduced their risks by 41% and 21%.

Even the “insufficiently active” lowered their risk by a significant amount – 37% and 14%, the researchers said, writing in an article published online in JAMA Internal Medicine.

How much physical activity should I do?

People aged 19-64 should try to do:

  • at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity, such as cycling or fast walking every week, and
  • strength exercises (such as lifting weights) on two or more days a week that work all the major muscles

Or

  • 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity, such as running or a game of singles tennis every week, and
  • strength exercises on two or more days a week that work all the major muscles

Or

  • a mix of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity every week, such as two 30-minute runs plus 30 minutes of fast walking, and
  • strength exercises on two or more days a week that work all the major muscles

Source: NHS Choices and Public Health England

Dr Gary O’Donovan, study author and expert in physical activity and health, from Loughborough University, said the key was doing exercise that was “purposeful, and done with the intention of improving health”.

“You are not going to fidget or stand your way to health,” he said.

He added that a commitment to an active lifestyle was usually accompanied by other healthy lifestyle options, which made a positive difference regardless of body mass index (BMI).

But Dr O’Donovan said no-one yet knew the best way of meeting the weekly recommended exercise total.

‘Every little counts’

The study cannot show a direct link between physical activity and a reduction in health risks in individuals.

But extensive research has shown that exercise and a healthy diet can reduce the risk of a range of diseases – such as cancer, heart disease and type-2 diabetes – as well as helping to control weight, blood pressure and reduce symptoms of depression.

Justin Varney, national lead for adult health and wellbeing at Public Health England (PHE), said: “The maximum health benefits are achieved from 150 minutes of moderate activity per week.

“However, every little counts and just 10 minutes of physical activity will provide health benefits.”

Source of above article is BBCNEWS

Why exercise is important during holidays

Healthy living is important during holidays

Another reason to exercise every day during the holidays

   holiday exercise,healthy living

Yes, of course we all know we should exercise every day during the holiday season to help counter the onslaught of excess calories that started on Thanksgiving and will mercifully end with a New Year’s toast.

We may even tire of hearing about exercise and weight from family, friends and the media. But an equally important reason to exercise every day is related to blood pressure, not waistline.

As a physiologist who has studied exercise and health for over 20 years, I can tell you that exercise lowers blood pressure – and does so right away. Whether you go for a daily run or brisk walk, every time you finish exercising your blood pressure goes down, and stays down for many hours, which is good for your overall health. Here’s why.

Immediate drop in blood pressure occurs

The immediate blood pressure lowering effect of exercise is referred to as “post-exercise hypotension,” and many studies have shown that blood pressure declines 5 to 7 mmHg after every exercise session. The mechanisms responsible for lowering blood pressure immediately after exercise are not fully understood, but involve dilation of the blood vessels. Whatever the precise cause, this phenomenon is clearly beneficial.

During exercise the opposite occurs, blood pressure actually increases dramatically. Why? We are hardwired to exercise. When we exercise, our working muscles need oxygen-rich blood. Our brain signals the heart to increase blood flow and blood pressure rises. Systolic blood pressure (top number) can exceed 180 mmHg during hard exercise.

This sounds like a crazy-high number, and it would be if a reading like this were taken while seated, but it is not unusual during strenuous exercise. High blood pressure values during exercise are offset by the many low values recorded after exercise, to the benefit of the body.

Why worry about blood pressure? Simply put, high blood pressure (i.e., hypertension) kills. It is estimated that hypertension is a primary or contributing cause of death of more than 400,000 Americans annually. Estimates suggest that one billion people worldwide have hypertension. Here in the U.S., one-third of the population is hypertensive, and these numbers are projected to rise 7 percent by 2030. This is not just a concern for older adults – one estimate suggests that 19 percent of young adults have hypertension.

Hypertension increases the risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The societal costs of hypertension are astronomical. When you consider the cost of health care services, medications and missed days of work, estimates suggest that hypertension costs the U.S. US$46 billion per year. Often, there are no signs or symptoms of hypertension, which is why it is referred to as the “silent killer.” Even among adults who have been diagnosed with hypertension, nearly half do not have it under control despite taking medications. Needless to say, anything you can do to lower your blood pressure will lower your risk of disease.

Great news: You don’t have to spend hours on this

As my colleagues and I point out in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, exercise guidelines for those with hypertension emphasize the importance of daily or near-daily exercise to lower blood pressure. While the guidelines focus on those diagnosed with hypertension, daily exercise can benefit everyone.

To some, daily exercise may seem onerous, but the good news is that the exercise need not be intense or lengthy – moderate intensity exercise such as brisk walking for 30 minutes will lead to reductions in blood pressure. There is even evidence that short exercise bouts throughout the day (e.g., 10 minutes, three times per day) can lower blood pressure.

The bottom line is that exercising every day (and obviously eating less) will help prevent holiday weight gain, but an equally important benefit of daily exercise is lower blood pressure.

My opinion

Holidays have a habit causing people to indulge on a lot of bad foods which could cause a lot of damage on their bodies. The key is to eat your treats moderately. This could also apply to your exercise. Instead of looking to go into rigorous exercise rather keep doing beach walks  while eating an ice cream instead of just eating an ice cream and sweets sitting on your coach. This could help you in making you healthy while enjoying your holidays,

Refrence for the above article is at The Conversation

 

You merely need light exercise to help win Diabetics over

Healthy living starts with light exercises

Standing or ‘Easy’ Walks May Help Type 2 Diabetics Control Blood Sugar

Study counters notion that vigorous exercise is key to battling the illness

gardening, healthy living tips

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) — For people with type 2 diabetes, better blood sugar control may be as easy as getting up off the couch and standing every so often, or taking a leisurely walk, a new study shows.

Dutch researchers noted that “moderate to vigorous” exercise is often recommended for people with diabetes — but most patients don’t comply with that advice.

This small new study suggests that even sitting a bit less might be of real benefit.

One diabetes expert in the United States agreed with that advice.

“For years, I would suggest an exercise regimen to my patients that I knew was doomed to failure,” said Dr. Robert Courgi, an endocrinologist at Northwell Health’s Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y.

However, “by tweaking the message a bit, the odds of success increase significantly,” he said. “Ultimately, any activity helps lower glucose [blood sugar]. The message of ‘sitting less’ will have a higher success rate than exercise regimens of the past.”

Current physical activity guidelines call for a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise a week to help prevent type 2 diabetes. But the study authors pointed out that nine out of 10 people fail to meet this guideline.

The new study was led by Bernard Duvivier of the department of human biology and movement science at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands. His team wanted to see if a program to reduce sitting time — by encouraging patients to simply stand and do light-intensity walking — could offer an alternative to a standard exercise regimen.

The study included 19 adults, average age 63, with type 2 diabetes who did three programs, each lasting four days. In the first program, the participants sat for 14 hours a day and did only one hour a day of walking and one hour a day of standing.

In the second program (the “sit less” program), the participants did a total of two hours a day of walking and three hours a day of standing by breaking up their sitting time every 30 minutes.

In the third program (exercise), the participants replaced an hour a day of sitting time with indoor cycling.

The sit less and exercise programs were designed to burn similar amounts of energy, the researchers said.

Significant improvements in blood sugar control occurred when the patients did the sit less program or the exercise program, but the improvements were generally stronger during the sit less phase, according to the study.

Courgi said the new trial has helped him “rethink the way I treat diabetes with exercise.”

He said that, although it would be nice to see the results replicated in a larger trial, the study findings remain “very interesting.”

The study was published Nov. 30 in the journal Diabetologia.

My opinion

We all know how hard it is to constantly start doing rigorous exercises (like going to the gym) in order to help fight away a certain sickness or just stay healthy. This is especially difficult for older people. What we must remember though is the fact that those rigorous exercises started out small as well but the habit is what made it easier for people to be able to do the rigorous one. One important aspect we should always bear in mind is the fact that when our bodies are moving , whether rigorously or light , this produces circulation. So whichever exercise you embark on it helps the blood flow and reach all essential organs. What we must understand about the power of light exercises is that they can be more powerful that the rigorous ones if they are done constantly throughout the day. This is vital to know because anyone is capable of doing such because we can all do light exercises throughout the day  (walking with a dog, gardening,cleaning around the house etc). This way of living ,each and everyday, will help fight against many illnesses not just Diabetes.

The information above may have been altered to fit this page

Reference for the articles is on healthdaily

Swimming, dancing and being in court can assist with a longer life.

Certain sports can make you live a healthy and long life

Want to delay death? Then swim, dance, or get on court, study shows

healthyliving tips

By Kate Kelland | LONDON

LONDON Swimming, racquet sports and aerobics are associated with the best odds of staving off death, and in particular of reducing the risk of dying from heart disease or stroke, scientists said on Tuesday.

In a study of various types of exercise and their risk levels, the researchers found that participation in specific sports showed significant benefits for public health, and urged doctors and policymakers to encourage people to take them up.

While the research, published in the British Journal and Sports Medicine, showed no added advantage for people who favour running and football or rugby, independent experts said this was purely due to the design of the study.

“This study must not be misinterpreted as showing that running and football do not protect against heart disease,” said Tim Chico, a consultant cardiologist at professor at Britain’s Sheffield University who was asked to comment on the findings.

The study analysed data from 11 annual health surveys for England and Scotland carried out between 1994 and 2008, covering 80,306 adults with an average age of 52.

Participants were asked about what type and how much exercise they had done in the preceding four weeks, and whether it had been enough to make them breathless and sweaty.

Exercise included heavy domestic chores and gardening; walking; cycling; swimming; aerobics, gymnastics or dance; running; football or rugby; and badminton, tennis or squash.

The survival of each participant was tracked for an average of nine years, during which time 8,790 of them died from all causes and 1,909 from heart disease or stroke.

Overall, compared with respondents who had not done a given sport, risk of death during the follow up period from any cause was 47 percent lower among those who played racquet sports, 28 percent lower among swimmers, 27 percent lower among dance aerobics fans and 15 percent lower among cyclists.

In death from heart disease and stroke, the study found racquet sports players had a 56 percent lower risk, with 41 percent for swimming and 36 percent for aerobics, compared with those who did not participate in these sports.

Chico said the study did find that both runners and footballers had a lower rate of death from heart disease. “Although this was not ‘statistically significant’, many other studies have found that runners live longer and suffer less heart disease,” he said.

“I will continue to tell my patients that regular physical activity (including running) is more effective in reducing their risk of heart disease than any drug I can prescribe.”

(Editing by Jeremy Gaunt)

My opinion

In my experience all types of physical activities do benefit your heart and help you live longer. I think the reason research found that dance, soccer and court sports help you live longer is the fact that these activities are usually played in a small area , like dancing where dancers require only a certain amount of space o dance just like in tennis. This I think puts less strain on the person's psychology in that they see a small area to move around in which ends up motivating them to exercise even more  unconsciously. In running for instant most people are defeated by seeing a long distance they have to run or if it is a small distance running, for most, ends up being a drag just because they have to exercise (told by a doctor). In sports such as tennis and dancing people usually do it because they enjoy the said sport. My reasoning is that which ever sport one is playing one needs to ensure they really enjoy it and it must not feel like they are being forced to do it because that creates added stress to the mind even before the activity.

The information on this site may have been altered to fit this page

For reference check REUTERS

Young People are having more strokes than old people

Healthy living tips for the young: Strokes can happen to anyone especially young people

Strokes Decline in Older Americans, Rise in Young

Every generation needs to watch their blood pressure, researchers say
WebMD News from HealthDay
Healthy living tips

 By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) — There’s a new generation gap in the United States — strokes are increasingly striking young people, and at the same time, stroke rates are dropping in those 55 and older, a new study reports.

“People born during what I call the ‘Golden Generation,’ 1945 to 1954, had lower rates of stroke than those born 20 years before them and also in the 20 years after them,” said lead researcher Joel Swerdel. He is a Ph.D. candidate at the Rutgers University School of Public Health in New Jersey.

People born during “Generation X” — between 1965 and 1974 — have a 43 percent higher rate of stroke than those born in the Golden Generation, researchers discovered.

Strokes primarily occur when a blood clot blocks a blood vessel or artery in the brain, starving the brain of oxygen and killing off brain cells in the affected area. It’s the fifth-leading cause of death in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Swerdel and his colleagues compared stroke and heart attack rates between generations using a unique database that includes nearly all hospitalizations for heart disease and stroke in New Jersey.

The investigators compared stroke rates for people at the same ages between generations, based on more than 225,000 records of stroke data between 1995 and 2014.

For example, the researchers looked at how many people aged 35 to 39 suffered a stroke between 1995 and 1999, and then stood that up against the number of stroke victims aged 35 to 39 between 2010 and 2014.

The results revealed an ever-increasing rate of stroke in younger generations. When comparing strokes that occurred in 1995-1999 against those in 2010-2014:

  • Stroke rates more than doubled in people 35 to 39 (a nearly 2.5-fold increase).
  • Stroke rates doubled in people aged 40 to 44.
  • Stroke rates increased by about 68 percent in people aged 45 to 54.
  • Strokes declined in all age groups 55 and older between 1995 and 2014, Swerdel said.

The so-called Golden Generation appears to be benefiting from blood pressure medication and cholesterol-lowering drugs that were unavailable to those who came before them, Swerdel suggested.

Baby boomers also dodged the twin epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes, which have hammered the health of younger generations, he said.

“If we look back at U.S. history, there was a big push towards adding a lot of sugar to food,” Swerdel said. “For instance, sugared cereals didn’t become popular until the early 1960s. The rates of obesity and diabetes in these younger groups may be a function of that.”

Daniel Lackland is a professor and director of translational neuroscience and population studies at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. He pointed out that younger people also have not had the dangers of high blood pressure (“hypertension“) sufficiently impressed upon them.

“The campaign against hypertension really began in the 1970s, where everybody should know their blood pressure and get their blood pressure under control,” Lackland said. “We think those programs had very, very high impact. These younger folks have not been exposed as diligently to that message.”

Doctors need to start reviewing people as early as their teenage years for signs of high blood pressure, said Lackland, a spokesman for the American Heart Association.

“Today, we have a significant number of pediatricians who come asking, ‘How do I diagnose and treat adult hypertension, because that’s what I’m seeing in my pediatric patients,'” Lackland said. “Everybody should have their blood pressure measured, and everybody should know their blood pressure.”

Both Swerdel and Lackland see these results as an early warning signal, rather than evidence of a hopeless situation.

“It sends up another alert that this isn’t going away,” Lackland said. “This is the pattern we’re going to continue to see if we don’t make some adjustments. On the good side, there are plenty of things we can do to make a significant difference.”

For example, public programs to reduce added sugars in foods and deter consumption of sugary drinks can help tremendously, Swerdel said. Campaigns emphasizing a healthy diet and physical activity also can contribute to positive change.

“In young people, it’s easy to change all this,” Lackland said. “Alter your diet, lose some weight and don’t eat as much salt.”

The study was released online Nov. 23 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

My opinion

It is evident that the measures that have been put publically like monitoring of high blood pressure in baby boomers has helped to produce a huge benefit to their health. The most likely reason  young people are having strokes is due to the public at large not emphasizing the need of young people to eat healthly and making them monitor the health (blood pressure tests). This becomes dangerous because that is where the problems develop. It is good to remember that illnesses such as strokes and heart attaches are developed over time, so if young people neglect their health at a young age continuously until adulthood they pose danger to their health when they get old. This is also the reason I always encourage young people to not only participate in sports (for physically activity) but also to focus on eating the healthy foods (mostly plant based) so as to preserve their bodies for a long period amount of years.

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Physical exercise can bring testosterone level to obese people

Exercise is a major healthy way for increasing testosterone in obese men

Aerobic exercise boosts testosterone for overweight men

Healthy living tips

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As men age, testosterone levels decrease. This can cause a number of physical and emotional changes, including weight gain, loss of bone density, depression, and reduced sex drive. A new study, however, suggests that for men who are overweight or obese, a 12-week aerobic exercise program can significantly boost testosterone levels.

Lead researcher Hiroshi Kumagai, of Tsukuba University in Japan, and colleagues recently presented their findings at the American Physiological Society’s Integrative Biology of Exercise VII Meeting in Phoenix, AZ.

Testosterone is a predominantly male sex hormone, mainly produced by the testicles.

In men, testosterone is responsible for sustaining sperm production, sex drive, facial and body hair, muscle size and strength, fat distribution, red blood cell production, and bone density.

According to the Mayo Clinic, men’s testosterone levels typically start to decrease from the age of 30 or 40, falling around 1 percent each year.

Kumagai and colleagues note that obesity is a leading risk factor for low testosterone levels. A 2015 study from the team established a link between diet and exercise and increased testosterone levels in men who were overweight or obese.

For the new study, the researchers set out to determine how regular aerobic exercise alone might affect the testosterone levels of overweight or obese men.

Overweight, obese men saw rise in testosterone with exercise program

The study involved 44 men, of whom 28 were overweight or obese and 16 were a normal weight. None of the men engaged in regular exercise.

All participants were required to take part in an aerobic exercise program that involved 40-60 minutes of walking or jogging 1-3 days a week for 12 weeks.

The men’s testosterone levels were measured before and after the exercise program.

While the program had no impact on the testosterone levels of normal-weight men, men who were overweight or obese saw a significant increase in levels of the hormone by the end of the 12 weeks.

In detail, overweight or obese men saw their total testosterone levels increase from 15.4 nanomoles per liter to 18.1 nanomoles per liter.

Overweight or obese men who exercise most vigorously during the 12-week program saw the highest increase in testosterone levels, the team notes.

Exercise, not weight loss, ‘a main factor for increasing testosterone levels’

The researchers point out that the testosterone levels of the overweight or obese men were still lower than those of the normal-weight men following the exercise intervention, but their findings remain promising.

Overweight or obese men did show some weight loss with the exercise program, which the researchers speculate may have contributed to the rise in testosterone levels.

“However, the degree of weight loss is small, and we found that the increase in vigorous physical activity was independently associated with the increase in serum testosterone levels,” notes Kumagai.

“So, it seems the increase in physical activity, especially vigorous physical activity, is the main factor for increasing serum testosterone levels.”

Hiroshi Kumagai

Read how testosterone gel might boost sexual function and mood for older men.

My opinion
It is evident that physical activity is more important then the loss of weight. This is true due to the fact that the human body was made to be active that is why as a person is younger the testosterone level is high. Exercise does more than increase your testosterone but it also helps increase your blood flow which helps your heart be healthier, increase your mood etc. Exercise will always be the number factor to help prevent your body from giving in.
References
This article was taken from Medical News Today. The article may have been changed to fit this site.

Vital exercises for healthy living in old people

Older hearts benefit from exercise that is frequent and varied but not intense

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Researchers, who analyzed data from a heart-health study of stroke-free older Americans, conclude that frequent and varied physical activity appears to protect against premature death. However, they found a higher risk of heart-related death among seniors who undertook frequent bouts of high intensity exercise.

Healthy living tip

Ying Kuen Cheung, a professor in biostatistics at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York, NY, and colleagues report their findings in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

The team hopes the study will help healthcare providers give better, more specific advice to their older patients on how to stay active and healthy.

According to the American Heart Association, regular exercise has many health benefits for older people.

For example, it can help prevent bone loss and thus reduce the chances of fracture, and it lessens the risk of many aging-related diseases.

Regular exercise also increases muscle strength and can improve balance and coordination, which in turn reduces the risk of falls. It can help older people get up from a chair, do household chores, go out shopping, carry their bags, and generally maintain quality of life and independence.

For their study, Prof. Cheung and colleagues analyzed data on 3,298 stroke-free people from different ethnic groups who took part in the population-based Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS).

Study looked at dimensions of physical activity

The team wanted to identify which dimensions of leisure-time physical activity might be linked to heart-related premature deaths in older people.

The authors note that previous studies have mostly used overall measures – such as total energy counts – and not looked at specific dimensions of physical activity, such as frequency, variety, and intensity of exercise.

The NOMAS data includes information that helps to evaluate medical, socioeconomic and other risk factors relevant to heart health in a group of people with no history of stroke.

The average age of the participants when they signed up to the study during 1993-2001 was 69 years.

After enrollment, they took part in yearly telephone interviews. The median follow-up was 17 years.

Every year, the participants answered questions about general health, plus frequency, intensity, and types of leisure time physical activity.

Examples of activity included walking, jogging, cycling, gardening, yard work, aerobics, water sports, tennis, golf, and squash.

Frequent, varied, but not intense

From the data, the researchers were able to assess frequency, variety, and intensity of physical activity, and compare them with heart-related and non-specific deaths. For exercise intensity, they used a measure called energy-to-duration ratio (EDR).

The analysis found that higher frequency of activity was linked to reduced rates of heart-related deaths, but it showed no link to non-heart-related deaths.

It also showed higher variety of activity (high number of activity types) appeared to be beneficial in protecting against death from any cause.

However, the team found a high EDR – frequent bouts of high intensity exercise – was linked to higher risk of heart-related deaths.

“Performing frequent and diverse exercise without high intensity in an elderly population such as ours is achievable and can reduce the risk of death,” says Prof. Cheung.

He says taking part in a large number of different activities can be more strongly linked to cardio-respiratory fitness. This could explain why they found variety of exercise appeared to have a protective effect across the board.

“Our findings thus suggest that high frequency of high intensity exercise may undo the benefits of frequent exercise in terms of cardiovascular mortality. Given the ease of participating in low intensity but daily leisure time physical activity, our findings suggest that this can be incorporated in current recommendations provided to older people.”

Prof. Ying Kuen Cheung

Author’s opinion

It is clear why the article points intense/high frequency causes death this is due largely to the fact that the old heart will, all of a sudden, be exposed to high exercise without prior exercises. The varied exercises will be better due to the fact that the heart is use to frequency. This concept is the same as lighting weights, One cannot just immediately lift large weights however they merely have to  first get use to the small weights for the muscles to develop. If the muscle is exposed to large weights the muscle could be damaged. The heart muscle works exactly like that.

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