Learning to maintain lost weight is more important than losing it

Healthy living tips for maintaining lost weight

healthy living tips

Photocred: bodysculptor

7 steps to help maintain weight loss for life

As a registered dietitian, many of my appointments with patients begin with harrowing tales of weight-loss programs from the past. Patients discuss details about why one worked over another and how much weight was lost in each.

Unfortunately, the majority of these attempts all end on the same note: gaining all, or more, of the weight back. Thousands of references are available to consumers on how to lose weight. However, very few sources identify, perhaps, the most important piece of the puzzle — how to keep the weight off. Here are some tips to help you manage the weight you worked so hard to lose.

1. Increase the exercise and decrease the calories

Imagine picking up two 10-pound weights and taking a 1-mile walk. It would be challenging to accomplish. Your body would have to work harder to compensate for the extra weight. Now drop the weights. Take the same walk. That exercise should be much easier. Your body is now more efficient, and the calories you’ll burn will go down. That’s exactly what happens when you lose 20 pounds.

To keep the weight off, you need to challenge your body by decreasing calories even further in some cases (because your body is not working as hard to get you from point A to point B anymore) and stepping it up on the exercise front. In fact, a 2014 study that followed individuals who lost weight and tracked their maintenance success, found those who maintained the most weight loss reported high levels of physical activity as well as a diet that was consistently low in calories and fat.

2. Weigh yourself often

The same study mentioned above also found individuals who successfully maintained their weight weighed themselves several times a week. A 2015 study found weighing in daily was equally effective, especially in men. The scale may be a good monitor of weight that may be creeping in.

Though if you find that you’re obsessing over the number on the scale, you may want to weigh yourself just once a week.

3. Consider a weight-loss program with a maintenance component

There are various methods of weight loss and as many experts to help see you through it. One study, which followed patients for 56 weeks after successful weight loss, found individuals who engaged in group visits as well as telephonic coaching maintained more weight loss than those who had no intervention at all. The study concluded having a maintenance routine in commercial and clinical settings could set the stage for better success at keeping weight off.

The take away? After you lose the weight, find a coach or a dietitian who can keep track of your maintenance habits for at least two years (the time period that predicts even further long-term success).

4. Work on your maintenance skills before losing weight

One study showed if you focus on maintenance behaviors first you’ll be more successful in the end. The study found women who engaged in eight weeks of maintenance skills regained less weight than women who did not focus on these behaviors beforehand. In the group of women who focused on maintenance first, they learned about energy-balance principles including: controlling portions without feeling deprived or dissatisfied, the importance of being physically active, weighing in daily to monitor fluctuations in weight, learning how to make small and easy adjustments to lifestyle habits, and navigating inevitable disruptions with confidence.

5. Up the ante

Research out of Duke found when participants were offered cash rewards for weight loss and maintenance, they were more successful with their weight-loss programs. The bottom line? Engage in workplace weight-loss programs that provide a monetary benefit for weight loss or structure a program yourself.

For every 10 pounds of weight loss, you can set aside a reward that is meaningful to you. For every three months of maintenance, set even bigger rewards such as a trip or a new wardrobe. Additionally, including family members and friends who are willing to contribute to the weight-loss pot (tell them it’s an investment in your health) may increase motivation even further.

6. Get a social communication plan in place

If you’ve ever lost weight, you know not everyone is happy to hear about your success. A 2017 study referred to negative behavior by others as you find weight-loss bliss as “lean stigma.” Researchers also found certain communication techniques could help in maintaining weight loss without compromising relationships. These included saving a “cheat night” for dinner out with friends, accepting unhealthy food options from friends but not eating them, or eating very small portions of unhealthy foods at family gatherings.

7. Don’t give up

This is hard stuff. Don’t throw in the towel if you gain back your weight. Using the “I’m a failure” approach may have you reverting back to bad habits, putting weight on and never getting back on track. Stay on the weight-loss wagon. Don’t lose sight of the hard work you’ve already put in.

Kristin Kirkpatrick, MS, R.D., is the manager of wellness nutrition services at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute in Cleveland, Ohio, and the author of “Skinny Liver.” Follow her on Twitter @KristinKirkpat. For more diet and fitness advice, sign up for our One Small Thing newsletter.

Reference for the above articles is: TODAY

Short term diet change will lead to more life for your on earth

A tiny change in a healthy diet can lead to an increased in lifespan even for old aged people

Better Diet, Longer Life?

A large study suggests you’re never too old to benefit from a commitment to eating healthier

healthy living tips

photocred: weightlossforall.com

 

By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Middle-aged and older adults who start eating better also tend to live longer, a large new study shows.

The findings, reported in the July 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, might not sound surprising. Health experts said they basically reinforce messages people have been hearing for years.

But the study is the first to show that sustained diet changes — even later in life — might extend people’s lives, the researchers said.

“A main take-home message is that it’s never too late to improve diet quality,” said lead researcher Mercedes Sotos-Prieto, a visiting scientist at the Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston.

“Most participants in our study were 60 years or older,” she noted.

The findings are based on nearly 74,000 U.S. health professionals who were part of two long-running studies that began in the 1970s and 1980s.

Between 1998 and 2010, almost 10,000 of those study participants died. Sotos-Prieto and her team looked at how people’s risk of early death related to any diet changes they’d made in the previous 12 years (1986 to 1998).

It turned out that people who had changed for the better — adding more fruits and vegetables and whole grains, for example — had a lower risk of premature death than those whose diets stayed the same.

In contrast, people who let their eating habits slide faced a higher risk of dying during the study period — 6 percent to 12 percent higher — compared to stable eaters, the findings showed.

How much of a difference did diet improvements make?

It varied a bit based on the measure of diet quality. The researchers used three scoring systems: the Alternate Healthy Eating Index; the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score; and the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet score.

The scoring systems differ somewhat, but all give more points to foods such as vegetables, fruit, whole grains, fish, low-fat dairy and sources of “good” fats, such as olive oil and nuts. Processed foods, sweets, red meat and butter, meanwhile, get lower ratings.

Overall, the study found, a 20-percentile improvement in diet quality was linked to an 8 percent to 17 percent decrease in the risk of early death from any cause. There was a similar dip in the risk of dying from heart disease or stroke, specifically.

That 20-percentile shift is a fairly minor change, according to Sotos-Prieto.

Swapping out one daily serving of red meat for one serving of legumes or nuts, for example, would do the trick, she said.

“Our results underscore the concept that modest improvements in diet quality over time could meaningfully influence mortality risk,” Sotos-Prieto said.

Alice Lichtenstein is a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association and a professor of nutrition science at Tufts University, in Boston.

“This study reinforces what we’ve been saying for a long time,” she said.

Ideally, healthy eating is a lifelong habit. But you’re never “too old” to make changes for the better, Lichtenstein noted.

“The key is to make changes that you can stick with for the rest of your life,” she stressed.

There are no magic-bullet foods or nutrients, Lichtenstein added. Instead, the new study “validates” the concept that it’s overall diet that matters, she explained.

Connie Diekman, a registered dietitian, agreed. A general guide, she said, is to start eating more plant foods.

When people do eat meat, Diekman suggested choosing leaner cuts.

“Shifting one meal from meat and potatoes to sauteed veggies, quinoa and a topping of grilled chicken or lean flank steak would be one way to move to a healthier eating pattern,” said Diekman, head of university nutrition at Washington University in St. Louis.

The good news, according to Lichtenstein, is that it is getting easier to eat healthfully. She said Americans generally have more access to a variety of whole grains and fruits and vegetables — fresh or frozen, which can be more economical.

Reference for the above story is Healthday

 

 

 

Avoiding eating unhealthy in the office

Healthy eating is vital to ensure in the office as most people spend their time there.

7 weight loss roadblocks you may encounter in your office

It’s easy to trip up on our diet and exercise goals when holed up in an office all day. But that doesn’t mean you have to surrender in the battle of the bulge.

HOW EATING CARBS CAN HELP YOU MEET YOUR WEIGHT LOSS GOALS

Fox News spoke with Lauren Blake, a dietitian at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, and Angel Planells, a Seattle-based dietitian and spokesman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, about some common diet mistakes people make at work, and how to fix them:

1. You sit for hours on end.
Sitting too long can really sabotage weight loss goals because every movement counts, Blake said. Try taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or go for a brief walk around the office every 30 – 45 minutes, Planells recommended.

2. You aren’t prepared for a hunger attack.
If you don’t have healthy snacks on hand, you’re more likely to head for the vending machine or mindlessly reach into the office candy jar. Blake and Planells recommended keeping healthy snacks like fruit and nuts on hand.

6 WAYS TO LOSE MORE WEIGHT AS YOU AGE

3. You suffer from on-the-job stress.
Chronic stress can trigger cortisol, a stress hormone that leads to fat storage and sugar cravings, Blake said. Try taking deep breaths, giving yourself small breaks, or going for a walk to manage your stress levels, she recommended.

4. You eat at your desk.
Eating at our desks “is a big no-no,” Planells told Fox News. When you do so, you’re not as mindful of what you’re eating, and you may overeat, he explained. Opt for a common dining area instead.

5. You don’t get enough sunshine.
Studies have shown sun exposure is associated with a lower BMI, so try to get some sunlight throughout the day, Blake recommended.

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6. You forget to pack your lunch.
If you don’t pack your lunch, you’re more likely to rely on fast food, Blake explained. Commit to packing a lunch one to two days per week. If you do eat out, “look for any way you can add vegetables,” Blake said, whether that’s a salad or lean protein and veggies. Or, opt for a soup and salad, Planells suggested.

7. Your coworkers’ bad habits rub off on you.
Sometimes, you may be tempted to go out more with your coworkers, or else partake in some of the decadent treats or snacks they bring, Planells said. Even if you can’t abstain from the treats, Planells said, try just taking a small portion — a half or a quarter of a donut, for instance.

 

Reference for the article is Fox news

 

less trans fat better heart health research finds

Eliminating trans fat in your diet is a healthy way of living

Trans Fat Bans Tied to Fewer Heart Attacks and Strokes

Laws that restrict adding trans fats to foods have had immediate beneficial effects on heart health, new research has found.

The Food and Drug Administration plans to restrict the use of trans fats in foods nationwide in 2018, but between 2007 and 2011, some counties in New York State, but not others, banned trans fatty acids in restaurants, bakeries, soup kitchens, park concessions and other public places where food is served. In a natural experiment to test the effect of the ban, researchers compared nine counties with trans fat restrictions to eight that had none.

Cardiovascular disease has been declining nationwide in recent years, but the decline was even steeper in counties where trans fats were banned. Three years after restrictions were imposed, there was an additional 6.2 percent decline in hospital admissions for heart attacks and strokes in counties that banned trans fats compared with those that did not. The study, in JAMA Cardiology, accounted for age and other demographic factors.

“The most important message from these data is that they confirm what we predicted — benefit in the reduction of heart attacks and strokes,” said the lead author, Dr. Eric J. Brandt, a fellow in cardiovascular medicine at Yale. “This is a well-planned and well-executed public policy.”

The above article is from New York Times

Increase of sodium over the years is being a concern

High blood pressure is from high Soduim diets in America

healthy living tips

Photocred: Honeybadgermom.com

Americans With High Blood Pressure Still Eating Too Much Salt

Average sodium intake more than double the recommended daily limit for these patients, study finds

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For Americans with high blood pressure, cutting back on salt is an important way to help keep the condition under control. Yet, new research shows that these patients are getting more salt in their diet than they did in 1999.

Between 1999 and 2012, salt (sodium) consumption rose from about 2,900 milligrams a day (mg/day) to 3,350 mg/day. That’s more than double the ideal upper limit of 1,500 mg/day of sodium recommended by the American Heart Association for people with high blood pressure (or “hypertension”).

One teaspoon of table salt contains about 2,300 mg of sodium. Salt also contains chloride, but it’s the sodium that’s concerning for heart and blood pressure problems.

Sodium is an essential nutrient that helps control water balance in the body. But too much can cause excess water to build up, increasing blood pressure, and putting a strain on the heart and blood vessels, according to the heart association.

“You really need to watch the salt in your diet, especially if you are hypertensive,” said study senior author Dr. Sameer Bansilal. He is an assistant professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

“People who eat too much salt are more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension, and they may suffer from complications of hypertension, like heart and kidney dysfunction, and heart attack and stroke,” he said.

According to Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, “These findings question the effectiveness of interventions to reduce salt consumption among hypertensive adults.”

For the study, Bansilal and colleagues collected data on more than 13,000 men and women who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2012. All of the participants had high blood pressure. Their average age was 60.

Daily sodium intake increased among people with high blood pressure by more than 14 percent overall from 1999 to 2012, the findings showed.

Among Hispanics and blacks, sodium consumption increased 26 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Among whites, sodium consumption increased 2 percent, the researchers found.

“Whites always had a higher salt consumption, so it’s not like they’re in a good place, it’s more like they were in a bad place and stayed there, and blacks and Hispanics caught up from being in a better place to being in a bad place as well,” Bansilal said.

People with the lowest salt consumption included those who had already had a heart attack or stroke, those taking blood pressure medications, people with diabetes, obese people and those with heart failure, he said.

“At least these people seemed to have taken the message to heart and have lowered their salt intake, so that’s reassuring,” Bansilal said.

For people without high blood pressure, U.S. dietary guidelines recommend a daily maximum of one teaspoon of salt a day (2,300 mg of sodium), Bansilal said.

Samantha Heller is senior clinical nutritionist at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. She said, “You may not think you are eating too much salt, but consider this: just one teaspoon of table salt has about 2,300 mg of sodium.”

And, she added, most of the sodium in your diet probably doesn’t come from your salt shaker.

“Over 75 percent of the salt we eat comes from packaged and prepared foods. Only about 15 to 20 percent comes from the salt shaker,” Heller said.

 

Sources of high-salt foods include highly processed, store-bought and prepared foods, such as soups, pizza, breads, sauces and cold cuts. Sodium is also in products such as baking soda, baking powder, monosodium glutamate (MSG), disodium phosphate, garlic salt, sodium benzoate and other additives, she said.

“Because some of these compounds are added to foods for shelf-life, texture and as a preservative or flavor enhancer, the food may not taste salty,” Heller said. “That does not mean that the salt content is not high.”

The World Health Organization predicts that an estimated 2.5 million deaths could be prevented each year if global salt consumption were reduced to the recommended level.

Heller suggested that “cooking from scratch at home more often is the easiest way to slash salt in our diets.”

The results of the study are scheduled to be presented March 19 at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting, in Washington, D.C. Findings presented at meetings are generally considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Reference for the above article is HealthDay

Aurthor’s opinion

It is clear that the sodium consumption increases as the years go on. This is due, in large to the processed food that is being done in my opinion. My advice would be to get into the habit of not adding salt into your diet, well this is a habit I have been doing for three years and it has done wonders to my health. I also Advice substituting bread with veggie or brown rice as these are a healthier way of living.

The dangers of night snacks in your health

Eating late at night could be more worse in your diet than you think

Credit:Foodnavigator.com

Late-night snack attack: There are ways to fight back

It’s worse than Dracula sucking blood, the power that cookies, candies, pies, chips and ice cream have over us after the sun goes down and the dinner dishes have been washed.

New Year’s resolutions are no match for the late-night snack attack: People who count every calorie at breakfast, faithfully avoid fast-food burgers for lunch and fix nutritious evening meals suddenly lose all resolve and find themselves face-planted in the refrigerator or snack drawer in the hours between dinner and bedtime.

This after-dinner/late-night snacking is so common, dietitians have a name for people who cave in to the evening munchies.

“We call them nighttime nibblers,” says Lisa Herzig, associate professor and director of the Dietetics and Food Administration Program at Fresno State. “They’re finding themselves all of a sudden in the kitchen and all of the good habits they’ve kind of built up so far go out the door.”

Some even refuse to face facts that they’ve sabotaged their diet, believing that the calories from the snacks they consume after dinner don’t count, Herzig says.

But oh, the calories do add up.

One bag of potato chips (about 160 calories) crunched between dinner and bedtime can undo a 42-minute after-work walk. Two chocolate-chip cookies (because who eats only one?) can wipe out an hour’s walk, packing as much as 220 calories apiece – or more – if they’re the big, gooey, home-baked kind.

Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/news/local/article128265804.html#storylink=cpy

For Joyce Mayhew, 42, of Clovis, her nighttime snack of choice: cereal. “Tons of bowls,” she says. And, there were bowls of popcorn and lots of cheese. “I loved cheese and leftovers.”

Before she knew it, Mayhew says, “I would double the calories I ate in the whole day at nighttime.”

A drama teacher and theater director, Mayhew turned last year to Herzig, a registered dietitian, for help to stop the snacking. She has lost 20 pounds by following the advice, which includes saving out something during the day to eat before bed “because I know I’m going to want it.”

People have emotional attachments to food, Herzig says. People eat when they’re angry, sad, lovelorn, hurt, stressed. Instead of testing your snack-control willpower, let yourself eat a small amount or substitute a less-caloric item for the salty, sweet or chocolatey-smooth item that you’re craving, she says. For example: “If you want to have a candy, take it out and pre-portion it. You can still have that familiarity.”

Mayhew says she also is following another tip from Herzig. “She told me to go to bed. Go to sleep.”

Studies have shown a possible link between sleep deprivation and obesity. When you’re tired, give into it, Herzig says. “Don’t fight through the fatigue with food because the food is going to wake you up. We don’t need to wake up. We actually need to sleep.”

And Herzig has her own method for avoiding snacks. “I am probably the slowest eater on the planet.” She takes 45 to 50 minutes to eat a meal. “I think we’re all in such a fast-paced world that we forget to savor our food.”

The Bee also asked people through Facebook for ways to curb after-dinner/late-night snacking.

Here are some of the tips:

▪ Take a long soak and read in the bathtub.

▪ “Eat about a handful of pine nuts. AMAZING to curb my appetite in the evening. They are full of protein and help you feel full, on fewer calories. Many more benefits as well.”

▪ “I have a bag of carrots in the fridge that I munch on. The crunching and chewing signal my brain that I am full (I eat far less) unlike the processed junk that I would normally turn to.”

▪ “Get braces – too much trouble to eat and clean the food stuck in them (lol).”

▪ “I don’t watch TV stations with food commercials. PBS, videos and on demand movies are good alternatives if you want to veg in front of the TV.”

▪ “One cup of hot decaf tea with honey helps when I’m hungry late at night.”

▪ “Eating nutritious organic food so the body doesn’t need to keep eating to get the nutrients it needs.”

▪ “Brushing teeth or chewing mint-flavored gum  the mint flavor makes food less desirable as it would ruin the flavor of many foods.”

▪ Knitting.

And another suggestion, “romance,” got a nod of approval and a chuckle from Herzig.

Barbara Anderson: 559-441-6310, @beehealthwriter

Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/news/local/article128265804.html#storylink=cpy
Reference for the above article is The Fresno Bee

secrets of eating healthy VERY CHEAP

Most people think eating healthy involves expensive. I have always had the same belief when I started my journey to healthy living. Overtime I discovered it is not expensive it is actually but the way you structure it will make it cheap. Here are some of the tips from Dr OZ about how to attain a cheap healthy diet.

Although I do share the same sentiments as he does but what I have seen in my life is that they way to a inexpensive health diet is about buying veggies and fruits in bulk and using that mostly to make your food. Not only will that decrease your expenses but it will also ensure you constantly have more greens in your diet involuntary.