Avoiding eating unhealthy in the office

Healthy eating is vital to ensure in the office as most people spend their time there.

7 weight loss roadblocks you may encounter in your office

It’s easy to trip up on our diet and exercise goals when holed up in an office all day. But that doesn’t mean you have to surrender in the battle of the bulge.

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Fox News spoke with Lauren Blake, a dietitian at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, and Angel Planells, a Seattle-based dietitian and spokesman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, about some common diet mistakes people make at work, and how to fix them:

1. You sit for hours on end.
Sitting too long can really sabotage weight loss goals because every movement counts, Blake said. Try taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or go for a brief walk around the office every 30 – 45 minutes, Planells recommended.

2. You aren’t prepared for a hunger attack.
If you don’t have healthy snacks on hand, you’re more likely to head for the vending machine or mindlessly reach into the office candy jar. Blake and Planells recommended keeping healthy snacks like fruit and nuts on hand.

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3. You suffer from on-the-job stress.
Chronic stress can trigger cortisol, a stress hormone that leads to fat storage and sugar cravings, Blake said. Try taking deep breaths, giving yourself small breaks, or going for a walk to manage your stress levels, she recommended.

4. You eat at your desk.
Eating at our desks “is a big no-no,” Planells told Fox News. When you do so, you’re not as mindful of what you’re eating, and you may overeat, he explained. Opt for a common dining area instead.

5. You don’t get enough sunshine.
Studies have shown sun exposure is associated with a lower BMI, so try to get some sunlight throughout the day, Blake recommended.

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6. You forget to pack your lunch.
If you don’t pack your lunch, you’re more likely to rely on fast food, Blake explained. Commit to packing a lunch one to two days per week. If you do eat out, “look for any way you can add vegetables,” Blake said, whether that’s a salad or lean protein and veggies. Or, opt for a soup and salad, Planells suggested.

7. Your coworkers’ bad habits rub off on you.
Sometimes, you may be tempted to go out more with your coworkers, or else partake in some of the decadent treats or snacks they bring, Planells said. Even if you can’t abstain from the treats, Planells said, try just taking a small portion — a half or a quarter of a donut, for instance.

 

Reference for the article is Fox news

 

less trans fat better heart health research finds

Eliminating trans fat in your diet is a healthy way of living

Trans Fat Bans Tied to Fewer Heart Attacks and Strokes

Laws that restrict adding trans fats to foods have had immediate beneficial effects on heart health, new research has found.

The Food and Drug Administration plans to restrict the use of trans fats in foods nationwide in 2018, but between 2007 and 2011, some counties in New York State, but not others, banned trans fatty acids in restaurants, bakeries, soup kitchens, park concessions and other public places where food is served. In a natural experiment to test the effect of the ban, researchers compared nine counties with trans fat restrictions to eight that had none.

Cardiovascular disease has been declining nationwide in recent years, but the decline was even steeper in counties where trans fats were banned. Three years after restrictions were imposed, there was an additional 6.2 percent decline in hospital admissions for heart attacks and strokes in counties that banned trans fats compared with those that did not. The study, in JAMA Cardiology, accounted for age and other demographic factors.

“The most important message from these data is that they confirm what we predicted — benefit in the reduction of heart attacks and strokes,” said the lead author, Dr. Eric J. Brandt, a fellow in cardiovascular medicine at Yale. “This is a well-planned and well-executed public policy.”

The above article is from New York Times

Increase of sodium over the years is being a concern

High blood pressure is from high Soduim diets in America

healthy living tips

Photocred: Honeybadgermom.com

Americans With High Blood Pressure Still Eating Too Much Salt

Average sodium intake more than double the recommended daily limit for these patients, study finds

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For Americans with high blood pressure, cutting back on salt is an important way to help keep the condition under control. Yet, new research shows that these patients are getting more salt in their diet than they did in 1999.

Between 1999 and 2012, salt (sodium) consumption rose from about 2,900 milligrams a day (mg/day) to 3,350 mg/day. That’s more than double the ideal upper limit of 1,500 mg/day of sodium recommended by the American Heart Association for people with high blood pressure (or “hypertension”).

One teaspoon of table salt contains about 2,300 mg of sodium. Salt also contains chloride, but it’s the sodium that’s concerning for heart and blood pressure problems.

Sodium is an essential nutrient that helps control water balance in the body. But too much can cause excess water to build up, increasing blood pressure, and putting a strain on the heart and blood vessels, according to the heart association.

“You really need to watch the salt in your diet, especially if you are hypertensive,” said study senior author Dr. Sameer Bansilal. He is an assistant professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

“People who eat too much salt are more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension, and they may suffer from complications of hypertension, like heart and kidney dysfunction, and heart attack and stroke,” he said.

According to Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, “These findings question the effectiveness of interventions to reduce salt consumption among hypertensive adults.”

For the study, Bansilal and colleagues collected data on more than 13,000 men and women who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2012. All of the participants had high blood pressure. Their average age was 60.

Daily sodium intake increased among people with high blood pressure by more than 14 percent overall from 1999 to 2012, the findings showed.

Among Hispanics and blacks, sodium consumption increased 26 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Among whites, sodium consumption increased 2 percent, the researchers found.

“Whites always had a higher salt consumption, so it’s not like they’re in a good place, it’s more like they were in a bad place and stayed there, and blacks and Hispanics caught up from being in a better place to being in a bad place as well,” Bansilal said.

People with the lowest salt consumption included those who had already had a heart attack or stroke, those taking blood pressure medications, people with diabetes, obese people and those with heart failure, he said.

“At least these people seemed to have taken the message to heart and have lowered their salt intake, so that’s reassuring,” Bansilal said.

For people without high blood pressure, U.S. dietary guidelines recommend a daily maximum of one teaspoon of salt a day (2,300 mg of sodium), Bansilal said.

Samantha Heller is senior clinical nutritionist at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. She said, “You may not think you are eating too much salt, but consider this: just one teaspoon of table salt has about 2,300 mg of sodium.”

And, she added, most of the sodium in your diet probably doesn’t come from your salt shaker.

“Over 75 percent of the salt we eat comes from packaged and prepared foods. Only about 15 to 20 percent comes from the salt shaker,” Heller said.

 

Sources of high-salt foods include highly processed, store-bought and prepared foods, such as soups, pizza, breads, sauces and cold cuts. Sodium is also in products such as baking soda, baking powder, monosodium glutamate (MSG), disodium phosphate, garlic salt, sodium benzoate and other additives, she said.

“Because some of these compounds are added to foods for shelf-life, texture and as a preservative or flavor enhancer, the food may not taste salty,” Heller said. “That does not mean that the salt content is not high.”

The World Health Organization predicts that an estimated 2.5 million deaths could be prevented each year if global salt consumption were reduced to the recommended level.

Heller suggested that “cooking from scratch at home more often is the easiest way to slash salt in our diets.”

The results of the study are scheduled to be presented March 19 at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting, in Washington, D.C. Findings presented at meetings are generally considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Reference for the above article is HealthDay

Aurthor’s opinion

It is clear that the sodium consumption increases as the years go on. This is due, in large to the processed food that is being done in my opinion. My advice would be to get into the habit of not adding salt into your diet, well this is a habit I have been doing for three years and it has done wonders to my health. I also Advice substituting bread with veggie or brown rice as these are a healthier way of living.

The dangers of night snacks in your health

Eating late at night could be more worse in your diet than you think

Credit:Foodnavigator.com

Late-night snack attack: There are ways to fight back

It’s worse than Dracula sucking blood, the power that cookies, candies, pies, chips and ice cream have over us after the sun goes down and the dinner dishes have been washed.

New Year’s resolutions are no match for the late-night snack attack: People who count every calorie at breakfast, faithfully avoid fast-food burgers for lunch and fix nutritious evening meals suddenly lose all resolve and find themselves face-planted in the refrigerator or snack drawer in the hours between dinner and bedtime.

This after-dinner/late-night snacking is so common, dietitians have a name for people who cave in to the evening munchies.

“We call them nighttime nibblers,” says Lisa Herzig, associate professor and director of the Dietetics and Food Administration Program at Fresno State. “They’re finding themselves all of a sudden in the kitchen and all of the good habits they’ve kind of built up so far go out the door.”

Some even refuse to face facts that they’ve sabotaged their diet, believing that the calories from the snacks they consume after dinner don’t count, Herzig says.

But oh, the calories do add up.

One bag of potato chips (about 160 calories) crunched between dinner and bedtime can undo a 42-minute after-work walk. Two chocolate-chip cookies (because who eats only one?) can wipe out an hour’s walk, packing as much as 220 calories apiece – or more – if they’re the big, gooey, home-baked kind.

Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/news/local/article128265804.html#storylink=cpy

For Joyce Mayhew, 42, of Clovis, her nighttime snack of choice: cereal. “Tons of bowls,” she says. And, there were bowls of popcorn and lots of cheese. “I loved cheese and leftovers.”

Before she knew it, Mayhew says, “I would double the calories I ate in the whole day at nighttime.”

A drama teacher and theater director, Mayhew turned last year to Herzig, a registered dietitian, for help to stop the snacking. She has lost 20 pounds by following the advice, which includes saving out something during the day to eat before bed “because I know I’m going to want it.”

People have emotional attachments to food, Herzig says. People eat when they’re angry, sad, lovelorn, hurt, stressed. Instead of testing your snack-control willpower, let yourself eat a small amount or substitute a less-caloric item for the salty, sweet or chocolatey-smooth item that you’re craving, she says. For example: “If you want to have a candy, take it out and pre-portion it. You can still have that familiarity.”

Mayhew says she also is following another tip from Herzig. “She told me to go to bed. Go to sleep.”

Studies have shown a possible link between sleep deprivation and obesity. When you’re tired, give into it, Herzig says. “Don’t fight through the fatigue with food because the food is going to wake you up. We don’t need to wake up. We actually need to sleep.”

And Herzig has her own method for avoiding snacks. “I am probably the slowest eater on the planet.” She takes 45 to 50 minutes to eat a meal. “I think we’re all in such a fast-paced world that we forget to savor our food.”

The Bee also asked people through Facebook for ways to curb after-dinner/late-night snacking.

Here are some of the tips:

▪ Take a long soak and read in the bathtub.

▪ “Eat about a handful of pine nuts. AMAZING to curb my appetite in the evening. They are full of protein and help you feel full, on fewer calories. Many more benefits as well.”

▪ “I have a bag of carrots in the fridge that I munch on. The crunching and chewing signal my brain that I am full (I eat far less) unlike the processed junk that I would normally turn to.”

▪ “Get braces – too much trouble to eat and clean the food stuck in them (lol).”

▪ “I don’t watch TV stations with food commercials. PBS, videos and on demand movies are good alternatives if you want to veg in front of the TV.”

▪ “One cup of hot decaf tea with honey helps when I’m hungry late at night.”

▪ “Eating nutritious organic food so the body doesn’t need to keep eating to get the nutrients it needs.”

▪ “Brushing teeth or chewing mint-flavored gum  the mint flavor makes food less desirable as it would ruin the flavor of many foods.”

▪ Knitting.

And another suggestion, “romance,” got a nod of approval and a chuckle from Herzig.

Barbara Anderson: 559-441-6310, @beehealthwriter

Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/news/local/article128265804.html#storylink=cpy
Reference for the above article is The Fresno Bee

secrets of eating healthy VERY CHEAP

Most people think eating healthy involves expensive. I have always had the same belief when I started my journey to healthy living. Overtime I discovered it is not expensive it is actually but the way you structure it will make it cheap. Here are some of the tips from Dr OZ about how to attain a cheap healthy diet.

Although I do share the same sentiments as he does but what I have seen in my life is that they way to a inexpensive health diet is about buying veggies and fruits in bulk and using that mostly to make your food. Not only will that decrease your expenses but it will also ensure you constantly have more greens in your diet involuntary.