Avoiding eating unhealthy in the office

Healthy eating is vital to ensure in the office as most people spend their time there.

7 weight loss roadblocks you may encounter in your office

It’s easy to trip up on our diet and exercise goals when holed up in an office all day. But that doesn’t mean you have to surrender in the battle of the bulge.

HOW EATING CARBS CAN HELP YOU MEET YOUR WEIGHT LOSS GOALS

Fox News spoke with Lauren Blake, a dietitian at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, and Angel Planells, a Seattle-based dietitian and spokesman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, about some common diet mistakes people make at work, and how to fix them:

1. You sit for hours on end.
Sitting too long can really sabotage weight loss goals because every movement counts, Blake said. Try taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or go for a brief walk around the office every 30 – 45 minutes, Planells recommended.

2. You aren’t prepared for a hunger attack.
If you don’t have healthy snacks on hand, you’re more likely to head for the vending machine or mindlessly reach into the office candy jar. Blake and Planells recommended keeping healthy snacks like fruit and nuts on hand.

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3. You suffer from on-the-job stress.
Chronic stress can trigger cortisol, a stress hormone that leads to fat storage and sugar cravings, Blake said. Try taking deep breaths, giving yourself small breaks, or going for a walk to manage your stress levels, she recommended.

4. You eat at your desk.
Eating at our desks “is a big no-no,” Planells told Fox News. When you do so, you’re not as mindful of what you’re eating, and you may overeat, he explained. Opt for a common dining area instead.

5. You don’t get enough sunshine.
Studies have shown sun exposure is associated with a lower BMI, so try to get some sunlight throughout the day, Blake recommended.

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6. You forget to pack your lunch.
If you don’t pack your lunch, you’re more likely to rely on fast food, Blake explained. Commit to packing a lunch one to two days per week. If you do eat out, “look for any way you can add vegetables,” Blake said, whether that’s a salad or lean protein and veggies. Or, opt for a soup and salad, Planells suggested.

7. Your coworkers’ bad habits rub off on you.
Sometimes, you may be tempted to go out more with your coworkers, or else partake in some of the decadent treats or snacks they bring, Planells said. Even if you can’t abstain from the treats, Planells said, try just taking a small portion — a half or a quarter of a donut, for instance.

 

Reference for the article is Fox news

 

Increase of sodium over the years is being a concern

High blood pressure is from high Soduim diets in America

healthy living tips

Photocred: Honeybadgermom.com

Americans With High Blood Pressure Still Eating Too Much Salt

Average sodium intake more than double the recommended daily limit for these patients, study finds

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For Americans with high blood pressure, cutting back on salt is an important way to help keep the condition under control. Yet, new research shows that these patients are getting more salt in their diet than they did in 1999.

Between 1999 and 2012, salt (sodium) consumption rose from about 2,900 milligrams a day (mg/day) to 3,350 mg/day. That’s more than double the ideal upper limit of 1,500 mg/day of sodium recommended by the American Heart Association for people with high blood pressure (or “hypertension”).

One teaspoon of table salt contains about 2,300 mg of sodium. Salt also contains chloride, but it’s the sodium that’s concerning for heart and blood pressure problems.

Sodium is an essential nutrient that helps control water balance in the body. But too much can cause excess water to build up, increasing blood pressure, and putting a strain on the heart and blood vessels, according to the heart association.

“You really need to watch the salt in your diet, especially if you are hypertensive,” said study senior author Dr. Sameer Bansilal. He is an assistant professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

“People who eat too much salt are more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension, and they may suffer from complications of hypertension, like heart and kidney dysfunction, and heart attack and stroke,” he said.

According to Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, “These findings question the effectiveness of interventions to reduce salt consumption among hypertensive adults.”

For the study, Bansilal and colleagues collected data on more than 13,000 men and women who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2012. All of the participants had high blood pressure. Their average age was 60.

Daily sodium intake increased among people with high blood pressure by more than 14 percent overall from 1999 to 2012, the findings showed.

Among Hispanics and blacks, sodium consumption increased 26 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Among whites, sodium consumption increased 2 percent, the researchers found.

“Whites always had a higher salt consumption, so it’s not like they’re in a good place, it’s more like they were in a bad place and stayed there, and blacks and Hispanics caught up from being in a better place to being in a bad place as well,” Bansilal said.

People with the lowest salt consumption included those who had already had a heart attack or stroke, those taking blood pressure medications, people with diabetes, obese people and those with heart failure, he said.

“At least these people seemed to have taken the message to heart and have lowered their salt intake, so that’s reassuring,” Bansilal said.

For people without high blood pressure, U.S. dietary guidelines recommend a daily maximum of one teaspoon of salt a day (2,300 mg of sodium), Bansilal said.

Samantha Heller is senior clinical nutritionist at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. She said, “You may not think you are eating too much salt, but consider this: just one teaspoon of table salt has about 2,300 mg of sodium.”

And, she added, most of the sodium in your diet probably doesn’t come from your salt shaker.

“Over 75 percent of the salt we eat comes from packaged and prepared foods. Only about 15 to 20 percent comes from the salt shaker,” Heller said.

 

Sources of high-salt foods include highly processed, store-bought and prepared foods, such as soups, pizza, breads, sauces and cold cuts. Sodium is also in products such as baking soda, baking powder, monosodium glutamate (MSG), disodium phosphate, garlic salt, sodium benzoate and other additives, she said.

“Because some of these compounds are added to foods for shelf-life, texture and as a preservative or flavor enhancer, the food may not taste salty,” Heller said. “That does not mean that the salt content is not high.”

The World Health Organization predicts that an estimated 2.5 million deaths could be prevented each year if global salt consumption were reduced to the recommended level.

Heller suggested that “cooking from scratch at home more often is the easiest way to slash salt in our diets.”

The results of the study are scheduled to be presented March 19 at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting, in Washington, D.C. Findings presented at meetings are generally considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Reference for the above article is HealthDay

Aurthor’s opinion

It is clear that the sodium consumption increases as the years go on. This is due, in large to the processed food that is being done in my opinion. My advice would be to get into the habit of not adding salt into your diet, well this is a habit I have been doing for three years and it has done wonders to my health. I also Advice substituting bread with veggie or brown rice as these are a healthier way of living.

A healthy version of food has entered the market

Kosher has take lots of households by storm

healthy living tips

cred:muslimmatters.org

Is Kosher Food Healthier?

When you go to the supermarket, you’ll see labels that appeal to all kinds of consumers, from the environmentally-conscious (“organic”) to the allergic (“dairy-free”). You’ll also see a label – “kosher” – originally intended to appeal to people who choose to eat that way to honor their religion. The label means the foods have been prepared in accordance with a set of specific, intricate biblical laws that detail not only which foods people of the Jewish faith can eat, but also how the food is prepared and processed.

Apparently, plenty of folks of all religions are gravitating toward the label. According to a report citing data from the market research firm Mintel, “kosher” was the top label claim on new foods and beverages launched in 2014, with 41 percent of such products donning the tag. Why? Likely because consumers seem to believe kosher items are safer, since they are produced under stricter supervision than the basic food supply, which is overseen by government inspection. Food safety, however, has more to do with how a food is handled (cleanliness) and stored (proper cooking and storage temperatures) than a religious practice.

So what is unique about kosher foods, and how can “kosher” on the label benefit you? Here’s what we know:

  • You can be assured that the overseeing and certification of kosher food is done under rigorous conditions and by the use of guidelines that are never abandoned. Unlike government regulations, these are laws that will not change. Once a kosher label is placed on a food, there is no negotiation about certain characteristics of that particular product.
  • If you are lactose intolerant, have an allergy to dairy products or follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, you can be sure that if a product is marked “pareve” or “parve,” it absolutely does not contain any meat, milk or dairy, nor has it come in contact with such products. There is not a chance that there will be a mistake.
  • Kosher foods will not contain some colorants like carmine that are derived from insects, even though such additives may be considered “natural” in other products.
  • Kosher pareve products are permitted to contain eggs, honey and fish. These foods may not correspond with the dietary laws of Hinduism or a vegan diet, so be sure to read the ingredient list carefully.
  • Kosher salt is lower in sodium content than table salt. By comparison, 1 teaspoon of kosher salt contains 1,120 milligrams of sodium, while the same amount of table salt provides about 2,400 milligrams. This is not an invitation to start shaking things up at the table. The only reason kosher salt is lower in sodium is because it has a larger grain. The larger the grain, the more space it takes up, therefore kosher salt has less sodium by volume, not by weight. By weight, all forms of salt contain about the same amount of sodium. (Meat and skin of kosher poultry, however, can have four to six times as much sodium as non-kosher poultry due to the salt that’s used in the process of making them kosher.)

Interestingly, the word “kosher” means “fit.” Although kosher foods are carefully watched over and controlled, that doesn’t mean choosing kosher foods will automatically keep you fit. The “kosher” label tells us nothing about the calorie, sugar, fat or nutritional profile of a food, so try to keep the preservation of health in mind while preserving tradition.

The above article is from US NEWS

Learning to gain weight is as important as learning to loose it

Weight gain can be done in an effective way

Cred:Mxzide.net

 

How to Gain Weight in a Healthy Way

It can be as difficult as losing weight for some people

Just like losing weight is a goal for some people, gaining weight is a goal for many others. And figuring out how to gain weight can be equally as difficult, for many different reasons. Factors like genetics, medications, stress, chronic health problems, and mental health struggles like depression, anxiety, or an eating disorder, can all make putting on weight a physical and mental challenge.

“We constantly hear about the obesity epidemic, and our society places such an emphasis on weight loss and dieting, but there are so many individuals out there who are struggling with the opposite problem,” Marla Scanzello, M.S., R.D., director of dietary service at Eating Recovery Center, tells SELF. “It is essential for [those individuals] to recognize that their needs are different and to tune out the unhelpful dieting and weight loss messages surrounding them,” Scanzello adds.

The truth is that for some people, being their healthiest self means gaining some weight. “Being underweight puts you at risk for a variety of health issues, including fragile bones, fertility issues, hair loss, a weakened immune system, fatigue, and malnutrition,” Alissa Rumsey, M.S., R.D., C.S.C.S., spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF.

Of course, healthy weight ranges will be different for every person. If you’re not sure what that means for you, definitely talk with your general physician or a registered dietitian. This is tricky, and what works for your friends won’t necessarily work for you, so it’s essential to do what’s right for your body and keeps you nourished, happy, and healthy.

(If you have an eating disorder, seeking help from a treatment center, or just a trusted doctor, is essential. You should not change your diet, count calories, or try to put on weight on your own before speaking with a professional who can help you come up with the right plan for you.)

If you are looking for ways to make weight gain easier, here are some tips for doing so in a healthy way.

Go get a physical.

If you don’t already know why weight gain is tough for you, it’s a good idea to see your doctor. Some chronic health conditions like hyperthyroidism and some digestive issues like Crohn’s disease can cause weight loss. You may also just have a very high metabolism, Rumsey says. Figuring out the underlying cause (if there is one) and treating that will help you reach your goals.

Do a mental health check.

“Some people may lose weight during times of stress or depression and need to regain weight for optimal health,” Scanzello says. “In these cases, it may also be helpful for them to see a therapist to address the underlying emotional issues contributing to lack of appetite and/or weight loss.”

Weight problems can be a physical symptom of stress, so check in on yourself and assess your stress levels. If you realize you need to get them in check, or that you’re struggling with other things like depression or anxiety, seeing a therapist can help you sort things out.

Eat smaller meals throughout the day.

“Often it can feel overwhelming to sit down to a large plate of food, so start out by eating more frequent meals,” Rumsey suggests. “Eating every two to three hours can help you get a lot of calories in without feeling stuffed.” It can also help mitigate some of the GI discomfort you may feel. “When individuals who have lost a significant amount of weight start increasing their food intake, they often experience uncomfortable physical symptoms, such as constipation, gas, bloating, and stomach pain,” Scanzello says. It may just be more comfortable physically to spread out the extra food needed to gain weight throughout the day.

Drink smoothies and shakes.

Energy-dense liquids are an easy way to take in more calories without feeling too uncomfortably full. “It is often easier to drink a lot of calories than to eat those calories via real food,” Rumsey notes. You can also pack them with vitamins and nutrients, and drink them on the go. Other calorically dense drinks can help, too. “Caloric fluids like milk and juice can also be added or used to replace fluids, such as water and diet drinks, to help meet energy needs for weight gain,” Scanzello says. Just be cautious of how much sugar you’re drinking—excess sugar can have negative health consequences, and you don’t want to fill up on sugar instead of nutrient-rich foods.

Focus on calorically dense but healthy foods.

It’s really important that you’re getting a healthy mix of nutrients, not just calories. “Weight gain due to more calories from unhealthy food sources like large amounts of salty, greasy, sugary, highly processed foods can cause other health problems down the road, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and heart disease,” Rumsey says.

Also, if you’re not loading up on healthful foods, you run the risk of remaining malnourished even after putting on weight. “It is best to increase food intake with a variety of foods and balance of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins to help replenish nutritional status,” Scanzello says. She suggests focusing on energy-dense foods, such as nuts, oils, dried fruit, granola, peanut butter, and other spreads and fats.

Cut back on cardio.

Scanzello emphasizes that for some people, exercise can be dangerous until you’ve reached a certain weight. “It is best to be medically cleared for exercise if underweight,” she says. If you’ve talked to your doctor and are given the go-ahead, Rumsey says stick to strength training over cardio. “For people looking to gain weight, I recommend an exercise regimen of mostly strength training, with very little cardio,” she says. Yes, you’ll still burn some calories lifting weights, but you will also put on muscle mass. Exercising a bit may also help stimulate your appetite, giving you an extra nudge toward reaching your goals.

Reference for the above article is SELF

Author’s opinion

Most people are only familiar with loosing weight, this leave the other population unaware of how they can gain weight. This overlooking of gaining weight leads to the belief that only being over weight is a problem. However it is vital to know that being underweight is just as dangerous as being over weight. Having a small body from a young age I can attest to the fact that it is extremely difficult to gain weight in a healthy way as the popular belief is that one needs to indulge in fatty foods to accomplish such feat. This is what leads to young people having conditions such as high cholesterol.

The dangers of night snacks in your health

Eating late at night could be more worse in your diet than you think

Credit:Foodnavigator.com

Late-night snack attack: There are ways to fight back

It’s worse than Dracula sucking blood, the power that cookies, candies, pies, chips and ice cream have over us after the sun goes down and the dinner dishes have been washed.

New Year’s resolutions are no match for the late-night snack attack: People who count every calorie at breakfast, faithfully avoid fast-food burgers for lunch and fix nutritious evening meals suddenly lose all resolve and find themselves face-planted in the refrigerator or snack drawer in the hours between dinner and bedtime.

This after-dinner/late-night snacking is so common, dietitians have a name for people who cave in to the evening munchies.

“We call them nighttime nibblers,” says Lisa Herzig, associate professor and director of the Dietetics and Food Administration Program at Fresno State. “They’re finding themselves all of a sudden in the kitchen and all of the good habits they’ve kind of built up so far go out the door.”

Some even refuse to face facts that they’ve sabotaged their diet, believing that the calories from the snacks they consume after dinner don’t count, Herzig says.

But oh, the calories do add up.

One bag of potato chips (about 160 calories) crunched between dinner and bedtime can undo a 42-minute after-work walk. Two chocolate-chip cookies (because who eats only one?) can wipe out an hour’s walk, packing as much as 220 calories apiece – or more – if they’re the big, gooey, home-baked kind.

Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/news/local/article128265804.html#storylink=cpy

For Joyce Mayhew, 42, of Clovis, her nighttime snack of choice: cereal. “Tons of bowls,” she says. And, there were bowls of popcorn and lots of cheese. “I loved cheese and leftovers.”

Before she knew it, Mayhew says, “I would double the calories I ate in the whole day at nighttime.”

A drama teacher and theater director, Mayhew turned last year to Herzig, a registered dietitian, for help to stop the snacking. She has lost 20 pounds by following the advice, which includes saving out something during the day to eat before bed “because I know I’m going to want it.”

People have emotional attachments to food, Herzig says. People eat when they’re angry, sad, lovelorn, hurt, stressed. Instead of testing your snack-control willpower, let yourself eat a small amount or substitute a less-caloric item for the salty, sweet or chocolatey-smooth item that you’re craving, she says. For example: “If you want to have a candy, take it out and pre-portion it. You can still have that familiarity.”

Mayhew says she also is following another tip from Herzig. “She told me to go to bed. Go to sleep.”

Studies have shown a possible link between sleep deprivation and obesity. When you’re tired, give into it, Herzig says. “Don’t fight through the fatigue with food because the food is going to wake you up. We don’t need to wake up. We actually need to sleep.”

And Herzig has her own method for avoiding snacks. “I am probably the slowest eater on the planet.” She takes 45 to 50 minutes to eat a meal. “I think we’re all in such a fast-paced world that we forget to savor our food.”

The Bee also asked people through Facebook for ways to curb after-dinner/late-night snacking.

Here are some of the tips:

▪ Take a long soak and read in the bathtub.

▪ “Eat about a handful of pine nuts. AMAZING to curb my appetite in the evening. They are full of protein and help you feel full, on fewer calories. Many more benefits as well.”

▪ “I have a bag of carrots in the fridge that I munch on. The crunching and chewing signal my brain that I am full (I eat far less) unlike the processed junk that I would normally turn to.”

▪ “Get braces – too much trouble to eat and clean the food stuck in them (lol).”

▪ “I don’t watch TV stations with food commercials. PBS, videos and on demand movies are good alternatives if you want to veg in front of the TV.”

▪ “One cup of hot decaf tea with honey helps when I’m hungry late at night.”

▪ “Eating nutritious organic food so the body doesn’t need to keep eating to get the nutrients it needs.”

▪ “Brushing teeth or chewing mint-flavored gum  the mint flavor makes food less desirable as it would ruin the flavor of many foods.”

▪ Knitting.

And another suggestion, “romance,” got a nod of approval and a chuckle from Herzig.

Barbara Anderson: 559-441-6310, @beehealthwriter

Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/news/local/article128265804.html#storylink=cpy
Reference for the above article is The Fresno Bee

Dangers of fatty foods to your insulin

fatty foods are never a healthy lifestyle and can endanger your health for good in one serving

healthy living tips

A single cheeseburger can trigger changes in body linked to diabetes and fatty liver disease, study warns

Fatty food can reduce sensitivity to insulin and raise levels of fats linked to heart disease

Just one fatty meal, such as a cheeseburger and chips, is enough to alter the body’s metabolism and trigger changes associated with liver disease and diabetes, researchers have found.

In bad news for anyone who enjoys the occasional greasy overindulgence, scientists have warned that consuming a big helping of rich, fatty food can reduce sensitivity to insulin and immediately raise levels of fats linked to heart disease.

While the bodies of those who keep fit may be able to recover from a fried chicken or pizza blow-out, lasting damage is likely to take place if it becomes a regular occurrence.

Researchers at the German Diabetes Centre in Dusseldorf, Germany, gave 14 lean and healthy men aged 20 to 40 either given a vanilla-flavoured palm oil drink or plain water.

The palm oil drink contained a similar amount of saturated fat as an eight-slice pepperoni pizza or a regular cheeseburger served with a large portion of chips.

Tests showed that consuming the palm oil resulted in an immediate increase in fat accumulation and reduced sensitivity to insulin, the vital hormone that regulates blood sugar.

It also raised levels of triglycerides – a type of fat linked to heart disease – altered liver function and led to changes in gene activity associated with fatty liver disease.

A single high-fat meal “would probably be sufficient to induce transient insulin resistance and impair hepatic [liver] metabolism,“ wrote the team in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

“We presume that lean, healthy individuals are able to compensate adequately for excessive intake of saturated fatty acids, however, sustained and repeated exposure to such nutrients will ultimately lead to chronic insulin resistance, and NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease).”

Palm oil was found to reduce insulin sensitivity by 25 per cent in the whole body, while the mechanism that generates glucose sugar from non-carbohydrate foods became 70 per cent more active.

Levels of glucagon, a hormone that stops blood sugar falling, were also raised. Similar effects were seen in mice given the same palm oil treatment.

Emily Burns, research communications manager at Diabetes UK, recommended following a balanced diet while further research took place.

“We know that eating too much saturated fat might be linked to insulin resistance and this study gives us some insight into what’s actually happening inside the body,” said Dr Burns.

“While this study suggests that fat has a real impact on the liver, we need to be careful how we interpret the results.

“The research didn’t involve any women and didn’t compare the effects of saturated fat to other foods like protein or unsaturated fat.”

Source of article is Independent UK

How cancer could be creeping into your health without you knowing it.

The foods we eat may have a cancer triggering mechanism

healthy living tips

Browned toast and potatoes are ‘potential cancer risk’, say food scientists

Bread, chips and potatoes should be cooked to a golden yellow colour, rather than brown, to reduce our intake of a chemical which could cause cancer, government food scientists are warning.

Acrylamide is produced when starchy foods are roasted, fried or grilled for too long at high temperatures.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) recommends carefully following cooking instructions and avoiding browning.

However, Cancer Research UK said the link was not proven in humans.

The FSA also says potatoes and parsnips should not be kept in the fridge.

Credit:dreamtimes.com

This is because sugar levels rise in the vegetables at low temperatures, potentially increasing the amount of acrylamide produced during cooking.

Acrylamide is present in many different types of food and is a natural by-product of the cooking process.

The highest levels of the substance are found in foods with high starch content which have been cooked above 120C, such as crisps, bread, breakfast cereals, biscuits, crackers, cakes and coffee.

It can also be produced during home cooking, when high-starch foods – such as potatoes, chips, bread and parsnips – are baked, roasted, grilled or fried at high temperatures.

When bread is grilled to make toast, for example, this causes more acrylamide to be produced. The darker the colour of the toast, the more acrylamide is present.

During the browning process, the sugar, amino acids and water present in the bread combine to create colour and acrylamide – as well as flavour and aromas.

The Food Standards Agency says it is not clear exactly how much acrylamide can be tolerated by people, but it does believe that we are eating too much of it.

So it is advising people to make small changes to the way they cook and prepare food, including:

  • Go for a golden yellow colour when toasting, frying, baking, or roasting starchy foods such as potatoes, bread and root vegetables
  • Don’t keep raw potatoes in the fridge – store them in a cool, dark place above 6C instead
  • Follow the cooking instructions carefully when heating oven chips, pizzas, roast potatoes and parsnips
  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet that includes five portions of vegetables and fruit per day as well as starchy carbohydrates

What’s the risk?

Research in animals has shown that the chemical is toxic to DNA and causes cancer – so scientists assume the same is true in people, although as yet there is no conclusive evidence.

The possible effects of acrylamide exposure include an increased lifetime risk of cancer and effects on the nervous and reproductive systems.

But whether or not acrylamide causes these effects in humans depends upon the level of exposure – and some are not convinced that there is any real danger to public health.

David Spiegelhalter, professor for the public understanding of risk at Cambridge University, said there was no estimate of the current harm caused by acrylamide or the benefit from a reduction.

He said: “Even adults with the highest consumption of acrylamide would need to consume 160 times as much to reach a level that might cause increased tumours in rats.”

 researches say food such as biscuits and bread produce Acrylimade which increases cancer

Credit:foodnetwork.com UK

Smoking exposes people to three to four times more acrylamide than non-smokers because the chemical is present in tobacco smoke.

As well as advising the public, the Food Standards Agency is also working with industry to reduce acrylamide in processed food.

And there has been some progress – between 2007 and 2015, it found evidence of an average 30% reduction in acrylamide across all products in the UK.

Steve Wearne, director of policy at the Food Standards Agency, said most people were not aware that acrylamide even existed.

“We want our campaign to highlight the issue so that consumers know how to make the small changes that may reduce their acrylamide consumption whilst still eating plenty of starchy carbohydrates and vegetables as recommended in government healthy eating advice.

“Although there is more to know about the true extent of the acrylamide risk, there is an important job for government, industry and others to do to help reduce acrylamide intake.”

High-calorie crisps

Emma Shields, health information officer from Cancer Research UK, acknowledges that acrylamide in food could be linked to cancer – but she says the link is not clear and consistent in humans.

“To be on the safe side, people can reduce their exposure by following a normal healthy, balanced diet – which includes eating fewer high calorie foods like crisps, chips and biscuits, which are the major sources of acrylamide.”

She said there was many other well-established risk factors for cancer “like smoking, obesity and alcohol which all have a big impact on the number of cancer cases in the UK”.

Reference for the above article is BBC news

my opinion

Whether Acrylamide does affect our health and expose us to cancer it is always good to ensure we stay on the safe side. Normally the foods that are said to produce acrylamide are deemed to be lowered in terms of their consumption.

seems to secret to living long has been found

Calorie restriction seems to be a way to longer lifespan

healthy living tips

Photocred:daily mail

Monkeys that eat less live longer after all, University of Wisconsin study finds

Monkeys that eat less than normal live longer and are healthier than other monkeys, meaning the same is likely true for humans, according to a new study by scientists at UW-Madison and the National Institute on Aging.

The institutions teamed up to look at why their previous, separate studies yielded contradictory results. Monkeys put on restricted diets in Madison saw benefits in survival and warding off disease, but similar monkeys at the federal institute in Baltimore, Maryland, did not.

The discrepancy raised questions about whether caloric restriction, found to increase lifespan in yeast, worms, flies and mice, could do the same in primates, including people.

Now, after combining data and comparing notes, the two groups of scientists found that the UW-Madison conclusions hold true overall, they reported Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.

“Reducing calorie intake improves health and survival,” said Rozalyn Anderson, a UW-Madison associate professor of medicine involved in the study. “What you eat and how much you eat will affect how you age.”

The cooperative analysis led to a new proposition, however. The level of caloric restriction necessary to extend life and improve health, initially thought to be 30 percent below a normal diet, might be considerably less. Researchers hope additional studies can pinpoint the amount.

“Is it 10 percent? It is 15?” Anderson said. “Maybe a little bit of food intake reduction is good enough.”

That premise stemmed from differences in how the studies at UW-Madison and the aging institute have been conducted. The institutions run the only long-term studies of caloric restriction in rhesus monkeys, considered good models of human biology.

The university’s study, started in 1989, involved 76 monkeys. The aging institute’s study, which began in 1987, enrolled 121 monkeys. Many of the monkeys have died naturally over the years, but the studies continue.

Both groups of scientists fed half of their monkeys less than normal. But in Madison, the food has been higher in fat and sugar, and monkeys on regular diets have been more free-fed. The university’s study didn’t initiate caloric restriction until monkeys were adults, but the aging institute started some monkeys on special diets when they were young.

At the aging institute, monkeys on regular diets didn’t eat much more than those whose caloric restriction started as adults. The body weight of monkeys on regular diets and special diets didn’t vary much.

 

That made it seem like eating fewer calories didn’t help the monkeys. But when both groups of monkeys at the aging institute were compared with those at the university, where food intake and weight among the groups differed more, it became clear that eating less prolongs life and improves health.

Another finding from the new analysis is that caloric restriction in monkeys is beneficial in adulthood but not when started at a young age, which is different from what had been found in mice.

Rhesus monkeys generally live 26 years, but those on the restricted diets live about 28 years, which translates to a gain of about six years for humans, Anderson said.

Rates of cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other conditions are more than twice as high among monkeys on regular diets than those on restricted diets, she said.

Among the 10 monkeys from the UW-Madison that are still alive, eight have been on restricted diets, with the oldest one nearly 36 years old, said Ricki Colman, a senior scientist at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, involved in the study. In the aging institute study, the oldest monkey is 43.

A caloric restriction study in people, based at Washington University in St. Louis, found that eating less than normal appeared to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and make people more sensitive to insulin.

But the study, in which people aimed to cut daily calorie intake by 25 percent over two years but achieved only a 12 percent reduction, did not find metabolic benefits identified in animal studies, according a report published in 2015 in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences.

The goal of the UW-Madison study is to better understand how the aging process increases the risk for disease, with the potential to identify new targets to prevent disease, Anderson said.

“When we can figure out what (caloric restriction) is doing, that will inform what is creating disease vulnerability in aging,” she said.

Reference for the above article is HostMandison

My opinion

The studies reveal that restricting calorie intake increases llifespans of monkeys and people. Studies also reveled that restricting diet from a young age depicted negative results on the monkeys,this could be due to the fact that at a young age we are all required to have enough food to fuel our bodies for us to function well. So as we grow older we merely need to consume foods that are not only healthy but not those are small in portions as our bodies have accumulated a lot already. The calorie deficient is also an element used in loosing weight.

 

A new campaign to help with developing health consciousness

This health campaign is one of a kind

Meals On Wheels Wants To Be The ‘Eyes and Ears’ For Hospitals, Doctors

healthy living tips

Photocred: Chicago.Suntimes.com

Debbie Case held an insulated bag with two packaged meals — a sandwich wrap and fruit for lunch, a burrito and cauliflower for dinner.

“You’re going to eat well today,” Case told 75-year-old Dave Kelly as she handed him the meals. Kelly lost his sight about two years ago and reluctantly gave up cooking.

After putting the food away, Kelly chatted with Case about his experience as a folk musician. As they talked in his living room, Case, CEO of San Diego County’s Meals on Wheels program, glanced around for hazards that could cause Kelly to fall.

Kelly said the homemade meals keep him from eating too much frozen food or take-out. But more than that, he said he appreciates someone coming by to check on him every day.

“Anything could happen,” Kelly said, adding that he worries about falling. “I wouldn’t want to lay around and suffer for days.”

Meals on Wheels is undergoing a dramatic overhaul as government and philanthropic funding fails to keep pace with a rapidly growing elderly population. The increased demand has resulted in lengthy waitlists and a need to find other sources of funding. And at the same time, for-profit companies such as Mom’s Meals are creating more competition.

Meals on Wheels, which has served seniors for more than 60 years through a network of independent nonprofits, is trying to formalize the health and safety checks its volunteers already conduct during their daily home visits to seniors. Through an ongoing campaign dubbed “More Than a Meal,” the organization hopes to demonstrate that it can play a critical role in the health care system.

“We know we are keeping people out of the hospital,” Case said. “Seven dollars a day is cheaper than $1,300 a day.”

Meals on Wheels America and several of the local programs around the country have launched partnerships with insurers, hospitals and health systems. By reporting to providers any physical or mental changes they observe, volunteers can help improve seniors’ health and reduce unnecessary emergency room visits and nursing home placements, said Ellie Hollander, CEO of Meals on Wheels America.

“It’s a small investment for a big payoff,” Hollander said.

healthy living tips

Photocred:khn.org

Studies conducted by Brown University researchers have shown that meal deliveries can help elderly people stay out of nursing homes, reduce falls and save states money.

Kali Thomas, an assistant professor at Brown University School of Public Health, estimated that if all states increased the number of older people receiving the meals by 1 percent, they would save more than $100 million. Research also has shown that the daily meal deliveries helped seniors’ mental health and eased their fears of being institutionalized.

Meals on Wheels can be the “eyes and ears” for health providers, especially in the case of seniors who are ill and don’t have family nearby, said Thomas, who authored several studies of the organization.

Meals on Wheels has “the potential to capitalize on that,” she said. “They realize they are doing something that is unique and needed in our current health care space.”

Visitors from Meals on Wheels are the only people some seniors see all day. The volunteers get to know them and can quickly recognize problems.

“You notice if they are losing weight, if their house is a mess, if they are talking awkwardly,” said Chris Baca, executive director of Meals on Wheels West in Santa Monica. “Our wellness check is critical and almost as important as the food itself.”

The meal delivery and in-home visits also reduce isolation among residents, said Zia Agha, chief medical officer for West Health, which has organizations that provide and study senior services. Agha said that while numerous high-tech gadgets are available to keep an eye on seniors, they can’t replace a volunteer’s human touch.

Meals on Wheels, Brown University and the West Health Institute recently launched a two-year project in six states to formally build health and safety screenings into daily meal deliveries. The goal is to improve seniors’ health and catch problems early.

“The fact that you don’t have resources to feed yourself or you are so frail you can’t cook is a very big marker that you are going to have high health care utilization,” Agha said. “There is value in targeting these clients through this meal delivery service.”

That’s also what Meals on Wheels America is planning to do in a new partnership with Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland. The project aims to keep seniors at home and reduce their need for costly health services after hospitalization. The idea is to have trained volunteers report red flags and ensure, for example, that patients with congestive heart failure are weighing themselves regularly and eating properly.

Dan Hale, who is leading the project from the hospital, said the meal delivery volunteers can help track patients’ health even months after discharge and keep them from returning to the hospital. “It makes sense financially,” he said.

Funding for Meals on Wheels organizations primarily comes from the federal government, state organizations and donors.

The partnerships with health care organizations and insurers mean additional money for the Los Angeles County programs, said Baca, who heads a countywide association of local Meals on Wheels organizations.

On a recent day in Santa Monica, volunteers showed up just after 10 a.m., loaded up their cars with meals and headed out to deliver them. One of the clients, 58-year old Patrick Ward, receives daily meals at his apartment in Venice.

Ward, who has osteoarthritis and knee problems, said he has fallen numerous times and also had a heart attack this year. He said he can take care of himself pretty well, but his lack of mobility makes cooking difficult.

“It takes one thing out of the day that I don’t have to worry about,” Ward said. “I know they are going to be here every day.”

This story was produced by Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Reference fo the above article is California healthline

The trend of eating the good foods seems to increase

Healthy eating habits to continue this year

Consumers are increasingly interested in functional foods, and enthusiasm for protein won’t trail off anytime this year, predicts the International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation.

healthy living tips

photocred:hsph.havard.edu

The reference for the above article is Food navigator