Avoiding eating unhealthy in the office

Healthy eating is vital to ensure in the office as most people spend their time there.

7 weight loss roadblocks you may encounter in your office

It’s easy to trip up on our diet and exercise goals when holed up in an office all day. But that doesn’t mean you have to surrender in the battle of the bulge.

HOW EATING CARBS CAN HELP YOU MEET YOUR WEIGHT LOSS GOALS

Fox News spoke with Lauren Blake, a dietitian at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, and Angel Planells, a Seattle-based dietitian and spokesman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, about some common diet mistakes people make at work, and how to fix them:

1. You sit for hours on end.
Sitting too long can really sabotage weight loss goals because every movement counts, Blake said. Try taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or go for a brief walk around the office every 30 – 45 minutes, Planells recommended.

2. You aren’t prepared for a hunger attack.
If you don’t have healthy snacks on hand, you’re more likely to head for the vending machine or mindlessly reach into the office candy jar. Blake and Planells recommended keeping healthy snacks like fruit and nuts on hand.

6 WAYS TO LOSE MORE WEIGHT AS YOU AGE

3. You suffer from on-the-job stress.
Chronic stress can trigger cortisol, a stress hormone that leads to fat storage and sugar cravings, Blake said. Try taking deep breaths, giving yourself small breaks, or going for a walk to manage your stress levels, she recommended.

4. You eat at your desk.
Eating at our desks “is a big no-no,” Planells told Fox News. When you do so, you’re not as mindful of what you’re eating, and you may overeat, he explained. Opt for a common dining area instead.

5. You don’t get enough sunshine.
Studies have shown sun exposure is associated with a lower BMI, so try to get some sunlight throughout the day, Blake recommended.

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6. You forget to pack your lunch.
If you don’t pack your lunch, you’re more likely to rely on fast food, Blake explained. Commit to packing a lunch one to two days per week. If you do eat out, “look for any way you can add vegetables,” Blake said, whether that’s a salad or lean protein and veggies. Or, opt for a soup and salad, Planells suggested.

7. Your coworkers’ bad habits rub off on you.
Sometimes, you may be tempted to go out more with your coworkers, or else partake in some of the decadent treats or snacks they bring, Planells said. Even if you can’t abstain from the treats, Planells said, try just taking a small portion — a half or a quarter of a donut, for instance.

 

Reference for the article is Fox news

 

less trans fat better heart health research finds

Eliminating trans fat in your diet is a healthy way of living

Trans Fat Bans Tied to Fewer Heart Attacks and Strokes

Laws that restrict adding trans fats to foods have had immediate beneficial effects on heart health, new research has found.

The Food and Drug Administration plans to restrict the use of trans fats in foods nationwide in 2018, but between 2007 and 2011, some counties in New York State, but not others, banned trans fatty acids in restaurants, bakeries, soup kitchens, park concessions and other public places where food is served. In a natural experiment to test the effect of the ban, researchers compared nine counties with trans fat restrictions to eight that had none.

Cardiovascular disease has been declining nationwide in recent years, but the decline was even steeper in counties where trans fats were banned. Three years after restrictions were imposed, there was an additional 6.2 percent decline in hospital admissions for heart attacks and strokes in counties that banned trans fats compared with those that did not. The study, in JAMA Cardiology, accounted for age and other demographic factors.

“The most important message from these data is that they confirm what we predicted — benefit in the reduction of heart attacks and strokes,” said the lead author, Dr. Eric J. Brandt, a fellow in cardiovascular medicine at Yale. “This is a well-planned and well-executed public policy.”

The above article is from New York Times

Increase of sodium over the years is being a concern

High blood pressure is from high Soduim diets in America

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Photocred: Honeybadgermom.com

Americans With High Blood Pressure Still Eating Too Much Salt

Average sodium intake more than double the recommended daily limit for these patients, study finds

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For Americans with high blood pressure, cutting back on salt is an important way to help keep the condition under control. Yet, new research shows that these patients are getting more salt in their diet than they did in 1999.

Between 1999 and 2012, salt (sodium) consumption rose from about 2,900 milligrams a day (mg/day) to 3,350 mg/day. That’s more than double the ideal upper limit of 1,500 mg/day of sodium recommended by the American Heart Association for people with high blood pressure (or “hypertension”).

One teaspoon of table salt contains about 2,300 mg of sodium. Salt also contains chloride, but it’s the sodium that’s concerning for heart and blood pressure problems.

Sodium is an essential nutrient that helps control water balance in the body. But too much can cause excess water to build up, increasing blood pressure, and putting a strain on the heart and blood vessels, according to the heart association.

“You really need to watch the salt in your diet, especially if you are hypertensive,” said study senior author Dr. Sameer Bansilal. He is an assistant professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

“People who eat too much salt are more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension, and they may suffer from complications of hypertension, like heart and kidney dysfunction, and heart attack and stroke,” he said.

According to Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, “These findings question the effectiveness of interventions to reduce salt consumption among hypertensive adults.”

For the study, Bansilal and colleagues collected data on more than 13,000 men and women who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2012. All of the participants had high blood pressure. Their average age was 60.

Daily sodium intake increased among people with high blood pressure by more than 14 percent overall from 1999 to 2012, the findings showed.

Among Hispanics and blacks, sodium consumption increased 26 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Among whites, sodium consumption increased 2 percent, the researchers found.

“Whites always had a higher salt consumption, so it’s not like they’re in a good place, it’s more like they were in a bad place and stayed there, and blacks and Hispanics caught up from being in a better place to being in a bad place as well,” Bansilal said.

People with the lowest salt consumption included those who had already had a heart attack or stroke, those taking blood pressure medications, people with diabetes, obese people and those with heart failure, he said.

“At least these people seemed to have taken the message to heart and have lowered their salt intake, so that’s reassuring,” Bansilal said.

For people without high blood pressure, U.S. dietary guidelines recommend a daily maximum of one teaspoon of salt a day (2,300 mg of sodium), Bansilal said.

Samantha Heller is senior clinical nutritionist at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. She said, “You may not think you are eating too much salt, but consider this: just one teaspoon of table salt has about 2,300 mg of sodium.”

And, she added, most of the sodium in your diet probably doesn’t come from your salt shaker.

“Over 75 percent of the salt we eat comes from packaged and prepared foods. Only about 15 to 20 percent comes from the salt shaker,” Heller said.

 

Sources of high-salt foods include highly processed, store-bought and prepared foods, such as soups, pizza, breads, sauces and cold cuts. Sodium is also in products such as baking soda, baking powder, monosodium glutamate (MSG), disodium phosphate, garlic salt, sodium benzoate and other additives, she said.

“Because some of these compounds are added to foods for shelf-life, texture and as a preservative or flavor enhancer, the food may not taste salty,” Heller said. “That does not mean that the salt content is not high.”

The World Health Organization predicts that an estimated 2.5 million deaths could be prevented each year if global salt consumption were reduced to the recommended level.

Heller suggested that “cooking from scratch at home more often is the easiest way to slash salt in our diets.”

The results of the study are scheduled to be presented March 19 at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting, in Washington, D.C. Findings presented at meetings are generally considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Reference for the above article is HealthDay

Aurthor’s opinion

It is clear that the sodium consumption increases as the years go on. This is due, in large to the processed food that is being done in my opinion. My advice would be to get into the habit of not adding salt into your diet, well this is a habit I have been doing for three years and it has done wonders to my health. I also Advice substituting bread with veggie or brown rice as these are a healthier way of living.

A healthy version of food has entered the market

Kosher has take lots of households by storm

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cred:muslimmatters.org

Is Kosher Food Healthier?

When you go to the supermarket, you’ll see labels that appeal to all kinds of consumers, from the environmentally-conscious (“organic”) to the allergic (“dairy-free”). You’ll also see a label – “kosher” – originally intended to appeal to people who choose to eat that way to honor their religion. The label means the foods have been prepared in accordance with a set of specific, intricate biblical laws that detail not only which foods people of the Jewish faith can eat, but also how the food is prepared and processed.

Apparently, plenty of folks of all religions are gravitating toward the label. According to a report citing data from the market research firm Mintel, “kosher” was the top label claim on new foods and beverages launched in 2014, with 41 percent of such products donning the tag. Why? Likely because consumers seem to believe kosher items are safer, since they are produced under stricter supervision than the basic food supply, which is overseen by government inspection. Food safety, however, has more to do with how a food is handled (cleanliness) and stored (proper cooking and storage temperatures) than a religious practice.

So what is unique about kosher foods, and how can “kosher” on the label benefit you? Here’s what we know:

  • You can be assured that the overseeing and certification of kosher food is done under rigorous conditions and by the use of guidelines that are never abandoned. Unlike government regulations, these are laws that will not change. Once a kosher label is placed on a food, there is no negotiation about certain characteristics of that particular product.
  • If you are lactose intolerant, have an allergy to dairy products or follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, you can be sure that if a product is marked “pareve” or “parve,” it absolutely does not contain any meat, milk or dairy, nor has it come in contact with such products. There is not a chance that there will be a mistake.
  • Kosher foods will not contain some colorants like carmine that are derived from insects, even though such additives may be considered “natural” in other products.
  • Kosher pareve products are permitted to contain eggs, honey and fish. These foods may not correspond with the dietary laws of Hinduism or a vegan diet, so be sure to read the ingredient list carefully.
  • Kosher salt is lower in sodium content than table salt. By comparison, 1 teaspoon of kosher salt contains 1,120 milligrams of sodium, while the same amount of table salt provides about 2,400 milligrams. This is not an invitation to start shaking things up at the table. The only reason kosher salt is lower in sodium is because it has a larger grain. The larger the grain, the more space it takes up, therefore kosher salt has less sodium by volume, not by weight. By weight, all forms of salt contain about the same amount of sodium. (Meat and skin of kosher poultry, however, can have four to six times as much sodium as non-kosher poultry due to the salt that’s used in the process of making them kosher.)

Interestingly, the word “kosher” means “fit.” Although kosher foods are carefully watched over and controlled, that doesn’t mean choosing kosher foods will automatically keep you fit. The “kosher” label tells us nothing about the calorie, sugar, fat or nutritional profile of a food, so try to keep the preservation of health in mind while preserving tradition.

The above article is from US NEWS

Learning to gain weight is as important as learning to loose it

Weight gain can be done in an effective way

Cred:Mxzide.net

 

How to Gain Weight in a Healthy Way

It can be as difficult as losing weight for some people

Just like losing weight is a goal for some people, gaining weight is a goal for many others. And figuring out how to gain weight can be equally as difficult, for many different reasons. Factors like genetics, medications, stress, chronic health problems, and mental health struggles like depression, anxiety, or an eating disorder, can all make putting on weight a physical and mental challenge.

“We constantly hear about the obesity epidemic, and our society places such an emphasis on weight loss and dieting, but there are so many individuals out there who are struggling with the opposite problem,” Marla Scanzello, M.S., R.D., director of dietary service at Eating Recovery Center, tells SELF. “It is essential for [those individuals] to recognize that their needs are different and to tune out the unhelpful dieting and weight loss messages surrounding them,” Scanzello adds.

The truth is that for some people, being their healthiest self means gaining some weight. “Being underweight puts you at risk for a variety of health issues, including fragile bones, fertility issues, hair loss, a weakened immune system, fatigue, and malnutrition,” Alissa Rumsey, M.S., R.D., C.S.C.S., spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF.

Of course, healthy weight ranges will be different for every person. If you’re not sure what that means for you, definitely talk with your general physician or a registered dietitian. This is tricky, and what works for your friends won’t necessarily work for you, so it’s essential to do what’s right for your body and keeps you nourished, happy, and healthy.

(If you have an eating disorder, seeking help from a treatment center, or just a trusted doctor, is essential. You should not change your diet, count calories, or try to put on weight on your own before speaking with a professional who can help you come up with the right plan for you.)

If you are looking for ways to make weight gain easier, here are some tips for doing so in a healthy way.

Go get a physical.

If you don’t already know why weight gain is tough for you, it’s a good idea to see your doctor. Some chronic health conditions like hyperthyroidism and some digestive issues like Crohn’s disease can cause weight loss. You may also just have a very high metabolism, Rumsey says. Figuring out the underlying cause (if there is one) and treating that will help you reach your goals.

Do a mental health check.

“Some people may lose weight during times of stress or depression and need to regain weight for optimal health,” Scanzello says. “In these cases, it may also be helpful for them to see a therapist to address the underlying emotional issues contributing to lack of appetite and/or weight loss.”

Weight problems can be a physical symptom of stress, so check in on yourself and assess your stress levels. If you realize you need to get them in check, or that you’re struggling with other things like depression or anxiety, seeing a therapist can help you sort things out.

Eat smaller meals throughout the day.

“Often it can feel overwhelming to sit down to a large plate of food, so start out by eating more frequent meals,” Rumsey suggests. “Eating every two to three hours can help you get a lot of calories in without feeling stuffed.” It can also help mitigate some of the GI discomfort you may feel. “When individuals who have lost a significant amount of weight start increasing their food intake, they often experience uncomfortable physical symptoms, such as constipation, gas, bloating, and stomach pain,” Scanzello says. It may just be more comfortable physically to spread out the extra food needed to gain weight throughout the day.

Drink smoothies and shakes.

Energy-dense liquids are an easy way to take in more calories without feeling too uncomfortably full. “It is often easier to drink a lot of calories than to eat those calories via real food,” Rumsey notes. You can also pack them with vitamins and nutrients, and drink them on the go. Other calorically dense drinks can help, too. “Caloric fluids like milk and juice can also be added or used to replace fluids, such as water and diet drinks, to help meet energy needs for weight gain,” Scanzello says. Just be cautious of how much sugar you’re drinking—excess sugar can have negative health consequences, and you don’t want to fill up on sugar instead of nutrient-rich foods.

Focus on calorically dense but healthy foods.

It’s really important that you’re getting a healthy mix of nutrients, not just calories. “Weight gain due to more calories from unhealthy food sources like large amounts of salty, greasy, sugary, highly processed foods can cause other health problems down the road, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and heart disease,” Rumsey says.

Also, if you’re not loading up on healthful foods, you run the risk of remaining malnourished even after putting on weight. “It is best to increase food intake with a variety of foods and balance of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins to help replenish nutritional status,” Scanzello says. She suggests focusing on energy-dense foods, such as nuts, oils, dried fruit, granola, peanut butter, and other spreads and fats.

Cut back on cardio.

Scanzello emphasizes that for some people, exercise can be dangerous until you’ve reached a certain weight. “It is best to be medically cleared for exercise if underweight,” she says. If you’ve talked to your doctor and are given the go-ahead, Rumsey says stick to strength training over cardio. “For people looking to gain weight, I recommend an exercise regimen of mostly strength training, with very little cardio,” she says. Yes, you’ll still burn some calories lifting weights, but you will also put on muscle mass. Exercising a bit may also help stimulate your appetite, giving you an extra nudge toward reaching your goals.

Reference for the above article is SELF

Author’s opinion

Most people are only familiar with loosing weight, this leave the other population unaware of how they can gain weight. This overlooking of gaining weight leads to the belief that only being over weight is a problem. However it is vital to know that being underweight is just as dangerous as being over weight. Having a small body from a young age I can attest to the fact that it is extremely difficult to gain weight in a healthy way as the popular belief is that one needs to indulge in fatty foods to accomplish such feat. This is what leads to young people having conditions such as high cholesterol.

Sitting done too long may shorten your lifespan

Healthy living requires lots of exercise as that is linked to less aging in your cells

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Credit:Viralnovalty.net

Too much sitting, too little exercise may accelerate biological aging

Older women with low physical activity and 10 hours of daily sit time had even ‘older’ cells

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary.

The study, publishing online January 18 in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found elderly women with less than 40 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day and who remain sedentary for more than 10 hours per day have shorter telomeres — tiny caps found on the ends of DNA strands, like the plastic tips of shoelaces, that protect chromosomes from deterioration and progressively shorten with age.

As a cell ages, its telomeres naturally shorten and fray, but health and lifestyle factors, such as obesity and smoking, may accelerate that process. Shortened telomeres are associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and major cancers.

“Our study found cells age faster with a sedentary lifestyle. Chronological age doesn’t always match biological age,” said Aladdin Shadyab, PhD, lead author of the study with the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Shadyab and his research team believe they are the first to objectively measure how the combination of sedentary time and exercise can impact the aging biomarker.

Nearly 1,500 women, ages 64 to 95, participated in the study. The women are part of the larger Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), a national, longitudinal study investigating the determinants of chronic diseases in postmenopausal women. The participants completed questionnaires and wore an accelerometer on their right hip for seven consecutive days during waking and sleeping hours to track their movements.

“We found that women who sat longer did not have shorter telomere length if they exercised for at least 30 minutes a day, the national recommended guideline,” said Shadyab. “Discussions about the benefits of exercise should start when we are young, and physical activity should continue to be part of our daily lives as we get older, even at 80 years old.”

Shadyab said future studies will examine how exercise relates to telomere length in younger populations and in men.

Reference for the above article is ScienceDaily

My opinion

As we keep seeing along the years that the human body is not only required to have exercise but it actually needs exercise in order for it to work optimally. Most studies seem to have a common theme about this topic of exercise and health. It is evident that each of us sets at least 30 minutes a day for exercises as a commitment. In the condition I had exercise proved to be a must as far as my recovery was concerned. Now I apply exercises daily to ensure the momentum. Remember it does have to be a long rigorous workout: moderate exercises at different times of the day do the trick.

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Cellphone is said to pose danger in your fitness routine

Cellphones have become an integral part of our lives but studies reveal how dangerous on your health and fitness

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Photocred:Actorfit

Why you shouldn’t use your cell phone while exercising

Do you really need your mobile when you’re working out? Researchers say talking and texting during exercise can cause all sorts of problems.

Talking or texting on your cell phone may spell trouble during exercise, researchers say.

Divided attention

In two studies, they found that talking or texting on a cell phone during a workout lowers the intensity of your exercise session. More importantly, the study team noted that cell phone use affects balance, which can increase your risk of injuries.

“If you’re talking or texting on your cell phone while you’re putting in your daily steps, your attention is divided between the two tasks and that can disrupt your postural stability, and therefore, possibly predispose individuals to other greater inherent risks such as falls and musculoskeletal injuries,” study author Michael Rebold, assistant professor of integrative exercise science at Hiram College in Ohio, said in a school news release.

Specifically, texting on a cell phone reduced postural stability by 45 percent. Even talking on a cell phone reduced postural stability by 19 percent.

But, if you want to pump up your workout with some tunes, go right ahead. Listening to music on a cell phone had no significant effect on postural stability during a workout, according to the study of 45 college students.

The studies about the effects of cell phone use during workouts were published in the journals Computers in Human Behaviour and Performance Enhancement & Health.

Reference for the above article is Health24

My opinion

It is evident that cellphone, although with their good benefits they give to use, they also have a huge disadvantage in our health. Although research dismisses cellphones as an item which disturbs us it is vital to know that they can be a great tool that the health sector can use to benefit us rather then disturb us. This can be done but incorporating vital apps o tools in the cellphones that will help to give us more out of the device or at least inhibiting apps for exercises.

Lack of Vitamin D is linked to headache problems

Increase your Vitamin D to help your health as a whole

Vitamin D deficiency increases risk of chronic headache

Vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk of chronic headache,according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The findings were published in Scientific Reports.

The Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, KIHD, analysed the serum vitamin D levels and occurrence of headache in approximately 2,600 men aged between 42 and 60 years in 1984-1989. In 68% of these men, the serum vitamin D level was below 50 nmol/l, which is generally considered the threshold for vitamin D deficiency. Chronic headache occurring at least on a weekly basis was reported by 250 men, and men reporting chronic headache had lower serum vitamin D levels than others.

When the study population was divided into four groups based on their serum vitamin D levels, the group with the lowest levels had over a twofold risk of chronic headache in comparison to the group with the highest levels. Chronic headache was also more frequently reported by men who were examined outside the summer months of June through September. Thanks to UVB radiation from the sun, the average serum vitamin D levels are higher during the summer months.

The study adds to the accumulating body of evidence linking a low intake of vitamin D to an increased risk of chronic diseases. Low vitamin D levels have been associated with the risk of headache also by some earlier, mainly considerably smaller studies.

In Finland and in other countries far from the Equator, UVB radiation from the sun is a sufficient source of vitamin D during the summer months, but outside the summer season, people need to make sure that they get sufficient vitamin D from food or from vitamin D supplements.

No scientific evidence relating to the benefits and possible adverse effects of long-term use in higher doses yet exists. The Finnish Vitamin D Trial, FIND, currently ongoing at the University of Eastern Finland will shed light on the question, as the five-year trial analyses the effects of high daily doses of vitamin D on the risk factors and development of diseases. The trial participants are taking a vitamin D supplement of 40 or 80 micrograms per day. The trial also investigates the effects of vitamin D supplementation on various pain conditions.

Reference for the above article is Science Daily

The workplace flexibility trend in 2017

Healthy living tips:Healthy living is about being happy in every sphere of your life

2017 looks like it will be a big year for workplace flexibility

Jessica Eve ‘Jessi’ Berrin, who works for Baptist Health South Florida, uses her iPad while working out of her car . Berrin has a flexible schedule at work. C.M. GUERRERO. cmguerrero@elnuevoherald.com

Healthy living tips

phtocred:Johns Hopkins

Jessi Berrin spends most days away from her desk at Baptist Health South Florida’s corporate offices in Miami, driving to events, sending email from the road and making her own schedule. While her work arrangement might seem nontraditional, in a way she represents the flexible work style millennials expect.

Berrin, 32, sees 2017 as the year when her generation gets more of what they want in the workplace: “The traditional 9 to 5 is not at all appealing to millennials, especially with technology moving faster than anyone can grasp. We want to work for employers who meet us where we are.”

Workplace flexibility used to be a benefit afforded to working mothers who wanted reduced hours. These days, flexibility is more about leaving work early to get to a fitness class and finishing up at night or working from home in the morning to avoid rush hour. With a tightening labor force and an increased desire for work-life balance, 2017 is poised to be the year when the most talked-about workplace trend gains traction.

FlexJobs, a Colorado-based online flexible jobs listing service with 55 career categories, predicts the number of companies that offer flexibility will continue in an upward spike. Already, 80 percent of 375 U.S. companies offer some sort of work flexibility options to employees, according to a 2015 survey by FlexJobs and nonprofit HR organization WorldatWork. The most prevalent flexibility programs offered are tele-work days on an ad-hoc basis, flex time and shortened workweeks. However, new options for flexibility go beyond traditional formats to include work-from-anywhere jobs, independent contract work and result-oriented positions.

Already, technology has made a desk in an office optional and led to the rise in people who work elsewhere some of the time. Berrin, director of government and community relations at Baptist, uses evolving technology to participate in virtual meetings or get an instant answer while working outside the office. “I don’t have to be physically present to be at table so I am able to be way more productive with my time,” Berrin says. She says it is trust that will make this trend toward flexibility stick. She files weekly reports and uses an online calendar to keep her supervisors informed. “I think managers will see that millennials are largely entrepreneurial and don’t need to be micromanaged.”

Workplace experts see 2017 as the year when companies will put more structure around flexible work options, provide more manager training and find ways to measure flexibility’s effectiveness. Improvement to everyday tools such as videoconferencing, shared calendars, computer monitoring programs and instant messaging will help bosses track progress and focus on accomplishments rather than face time.

With the job market tightening, staffing firms such as Robert Half believe companies of all sizes will allow more flexibility when possible. “If you have an excellent candidate with a hot skill set, he or she may have three other job offers,” says Laura Campin, division director at Robert Half International in Miami/Fort Lauderdale. “You can promise promotions but it is cheaper to offer flexibility to entice that candidate to accept your offer.” For example, flexibility in financial positions might allow for shorter days at slower times with the expectation of longer days at busier times, she says. “Some small employers don’t have capacity to offer formal flexible work programs, but they will be looking at what they can offer.”

The momentum around flexibility comes as working parents express more interest in changing jobs. Despite an ongoing national conversation about family-friendly workplaces, the 2016 Bright Horizon Modern Family Index survey of 530 men and women shows that both genders continue to worry about what happens to their careers after having children and that nearly 70 percent of new dads say that fatherhood will likely prompt a job change for them. The majority of parents said they would give up salary for flexibility. “I expect to see more employers take this issue seriously and adopt better program around flexible work practices,” says David Lissy, CEO of Bright Horizons of Watertown, Massachusetts, which has 1,000 centers in 43 states. In Florida, Bright Horizons has 922 employees and operates 34 childcare and early-education centers. “Working parents want to be successful and they are thinking carefully about the right place to be.”

An emerging and continually viable option for employees who don’t get support for flexibility at their workplaces are “agile” work arrangements — people working in a temporary, contract, consultant or freelance capacity. By 2018, as much as 50 percent of the workforce will be comprised of “agile” workers, according to the Workplace 2025 Study by Randstad U.S., an Atlanta-based national staffing firm that polled 1,500 executives and 3,100 workers. “Agile workers believe they are able to make more money on their own terms,” says Braulio Pena, managing director of Randstad Professionals in Miami, who sees some workers trying out employers before they commit. “There is much more interest in work-life balance.”

Increasingly, employers — when possible — are working to embed flexibility into their culture. Law firms are on the forefront of this trend. As Hilarie Bass, co-president of Greenberg Traurig in Miami, takes on the role of president-elect of the American Bar Association, she intends to work from wherever she sits — a plane, American Airlines’ Admirals Clubs, a client’s office, her home. “In our business, clients are most concerned about the quality of legal work and the quality of service and less concerned about where the work is being done,” she says. While that flexibility over where the work gets done will help lawyers better manage their lives, it doesn’t mean fewer work hours, she says. “The downside is everyone is expected to be reachable anytime by cell.”

Cindy Krischer Goodman writes the ‘Work/Life Balancing Act’ column for Business Monday in the Miami Herald. Connect with her at balancegal@gmail, @balancegal or worklifebalancingact.com.

Types of flexible work arrangements

Flextime: An employer requires workers to be in the workplace on certain days or available for a certain number of core hours each day. The employee has flexibility in setting his or her schedule.

Compressed work weeks: According to a survey on workplace flexibility by WorldatWork, the “4/10” workweek — where employees work four 10-hour days in the office, followed by three days off — is the most common alternative work schedule. Another popular option for achieving work-life balance is the “9/80” arrangement: Individuals work nine-hour days Monday through Thursday and get every other Friday off.

Telecommuting: Working from anywhere, at any time, is quickly becoming the norm at many companies, thanks to advances in technology such as cloud-based applications, online video and virtual meeting rooms. With this arrangement, employees work a portion or all of their normally scheduled work hours from a remote location.

Job sharing: A program in which two people share a position, each working part of the week.

Part-time work: A work schedule that is less than full-time but is at least half of the regularly scheduled full time.

Five remote career categories to watch in 2017

Mortgage and real estate: Zillow, Homeward Residential and American Advisors Group have recently recruited for remote jobs in mortgage and real estate. Mortgage loan officer, underwriter and mortgage processor are some common remote job titles in this category.

Human resources and recruiting: Aon Hewitt, Xerox and IT Pros have recently recruited for remote jobs in HR and recruiting. Recruiter, human resources specialist and human resources manager are some common remote job titles in this category.

Accounting and finance: Wells Fargo, Citi, and Ally Financial have recently recruited for remote jobs in accounting & finance. Accountant, bookkeeper and auditor are some common remote job titles in this category.

Pharmaceutical: CVS Health, Thermo Fisher Scientific and Pharmaceutical Product Development have recently recruited for remote jobs in pharmaceutical. Pharmacist, clinical research associate and account manager are some common remote job titles in this category.

Education and training: K12, Kaplan and Connections Education have recently recruited for remote jobs in education & training. Online tutor, adjunct faculty and virtual teacher are some common remote job titles in this category.

Source: FlexJobs, the leading job service for telecommuting and other flexible jobs, analyzed more than 100,000 job listings from the past year to identify five of the top career categories where the number of remote job listings has increased significantly. FlexJobs also has highlighted 10 great flexible jobs hiring now in Miami.

The reference for the above article is Miami Herald

 

Healthy sleeping tips to help your Guests

Healthy living is generated by a good night’s rest

Give Your Guests a Good Night’s Sleep

Healthy living tips

People don’t sleep as well during their first night in a new place and are more likely to wake up feeling tired and cranky the next morning, compared with when they sleep at home in their own beds. In fact, this phenomenon has a name: It’s been dubbed the “first-night effect.”

The reason this occurs is because half of the brain remains more alert during deep sleep—an evolutionary behavior that may have helped humans’ ancestors stay on guard for predators when sleeping in an unfamiliar environment.

Luckily for your house guests, the first-night effect lasts for only one night. And spending a little extra time getting the guest bedroom ready can make all the difference in how well they will sleep. Whether your guests are staying for a couple of days or a whole week, these four simple tips can help them sleep more comfortably.

Suggest that they bring their own pillows.

You’ll provide comfortable pillows, too, of course, but if your guests have something that reminds them of home—such as a personal pillow—it may trick their brains into thinking that they’re in their own beds, helping them get better sleep.

Keep it cool.

If you’re blasting the heat in your house to fight the cold weather, remember to turn down the thermostat at night. A room temperature between 60 and 67 degrees is optimal for sleep.

Shhh!

Nothing says the holidays like a house full of loved ones—but it can also cause quite a din. Unless everyone heads to bed at the same time, help your guests tune out the ruckus by placing a fan or white noise machine in their bedroom.

Give it a spritz.

Scents like lavender may lower both heart rate and blood pressure, allowing your guests to relax more easily before bed. Leave a perfumed room or linen spray by the bed for your visitors to use.

Reference for the article is National Sleep Foundation

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